Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to understand Monad Transformers in Scala by porting some examples from this tutorial by Dan Piponi: http://blog.sigfpe.com/2006/05/grok-haskell-monad-transformers.html

I did a couple of easy ones:

import Control.Monad.State
import Control.Monad.Identity

test1 = do
    a <- get
    modify (+1)
    b <- get
    return (a,b)

test2 = do
    a <- get
    modify (++"1")
    b <- get
    return (a,b)

go1 = evalState test1 0
go2 = evalState test2 "0" 

becomes:

import scalaz._, Scalaz._

val test1 = for {
  a <- get[Int]
  _ <- modify[Int](1+)
  b <- get
} yield (a,b)

val test2 = for {
  a <- get[String]
  _ <- modify[String](_ + "1")
  b <- get
} yield (a,b)

val go1 = test1.eval(0)
val go2 = test2.eval("0")

But how the heck can I port this next example to Scala?

test3 = do
    modify (+ 1)
    lift $ modify (++ "1")
    a <- get
    b <- lift get
    return (a,b)

go3 = runIdentity $ evalStateT (evalStateT test3 0) "0"

I've gotten this far using scalaz 7.1.0-M6:

type SST[F[_],A] = StateT[F,String,A]
type IST[F[_],A] = StateT[F,Int,A]

val p1: StateT[Id,Int,Unit] = modify[Int](1+)
val p2: StateT[Id,String,Unit] = modify[String](_ + "1")
val p3: StateT[({type l[a]=StateT[Id,String,a]})#l,Int,Unit] = p2.liftM[IST]

but that's not even close yet, and may even be backwards for all I can tell.

Of course I can do this:

import scalaz.Lens._
val test3 = for {
  _ <- firstLens[Int,String] lifts (modify (1+))
  _ <- secondLens[Int,String] lifts (modify (_ + "1"))
  a <- firstLens[Int,String] lifts get
  b <- secondLens[Int,String] lifts get
} yield (a,b)

val go3 = test3.eval(0,"0")

but then I'm not using stacked StateT at all, so it doesn't answer the question.

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The problem is that the modify you get with the usual imports is from State, and isn't going to help you with StateT.

It's a good idea to start with the Haskell type signature:

test3
  :: (MonadState [Char] m, MonadState s (t m), MonadTrans t,
      Num s) =>
     t m (s, [Char])

Which you should be able to translate into something like this:

import scalaz._, Scalaz._

def test3[M[_]: Monad](implicit
  inner: MonadState[({ type T[s, a] = StateT[M, s, a] })#T, String],
  outer: MonadState[
    ({
      type T[s, a] = StateT[({ type L[y] = StateT[M, String, y] })#L, s, a ]
    })#T,
    Int
  ],
  mt: MonadTrans[({ type L[f[_], a] = StateT[f, Int, a] })#L]
) = for {
  _ <- outer.modify(_ + 1)
  _ <- mt.liftMU(inner.modify(_ + "1"))
  a <- outer.get
  b <- mt.liftMU(inner.get)
} yield (a, b)

It's hideous, but it's a fairly straightforward rewording of the Haskell. For some reason the compiler doesn't seem to find the outer instance, though, so you have to help it a little:

def test3[M[_]: Monad](implicit
  inner: MonadState[({ type T[s, a] = StateT[M, s, a] })#T, String],
  mt: MonadTrans[({ type L[f[_], a] = StateT[f, Int, a] })#L]
) = {
  val outer =
    StateT.stateTMonadState[Int, ({ type L[y] = StateT[M, String, y] })#L]

  for {
    _ <- outer.modify(_ + 1)
    _ <- mt.liftMU(inner.modify(_ + "1"))
    a <- outer.get
    b <- mt.liftMU(inner.get)
  } yield (a, b)
}

Now you can write the following, for example:

scala> test3[Id].eval(0).eval("0")
res0: (Int, String) = (1,01)

Exactly as in the Haskell example.

Footnote

You can clean this up a bit if you're happy with committing to Id as the monad of the inner state transformer (as your comment suggests):

def test3 = {
  val mt = MonadTrans[({ type L[f[_], a] = StateT[f, Int, a] })#L]
  val outer = StateT.stateTMonadState[Int, ({ type L[y] = State[String, y] })#L]
  for {
    _ <- outer.modify(_ + 1)
    _ <- mt.liftMU(modify[String](_ + "1"))
    a <- outer.get
    b <- mt.liftMU(get[String])
  } yield (a, b)
}

It's a little less generic, but it may work for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of starting with the Haskell signature, and working backwards, but I get this from GHCi 7.4.2: test3 :: StateT Integer (StateT [Char] Identity) (Integer, [Char]). I vaguely understand that this is equivalent to the signature that you posted, but how would I get there myself? Or get from this signature to the scalaz equivalent? –  arya May 6 '14 at 16:01
1  
You can see the more generic type by defining test3 by itself in a REPL, for example. If you use it only in go3 it'll get specialized to the version you're seeing. –  Travis Brown May 6 '14 at 16:39
    
Oh, ok. Given that State, String and Int are hard-coded into the definitions anyway, is there any simpler/specialized implementation for scalaz as well? Or does letting the compiler find some of these instances actually simplify the code? –  arya May 6 '14 at 18:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.