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i am creating a scatterplot with pyplot but since i am updating this plot with new data, my program is getting slower and slower. Is there a way to update the plot without drawing it new? Here is some of my code:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
...
slicestart = 30 
sliceend = 50
#read some data:
tens_data = ... #3darray 50*321*321
pert = ...      #3darray 50*321*321
for slicer in range(slicestart,sliceend):
    tens = tens_data.data[slicer,:,:]
    plt.scatter(tens, pert, s=5, marker='o', color='blue', alpha=0.2)
    plt.grid(True)
    plt.xlabel('tendency')
    plt.ylabel('perturbation')
    plt.draw()
    plt.savefig('sc_test.png')

I also tried to do it a little bit different:

...
sc = plt.scatter([],[])

def update_scatter(sc, new_tens, new_pert):
    sc.set_xdata(np.append(sc.get_xdata(), new_tens))
    sc.set_ydata(np.append(sc.get_ydata(), new_pert))
    plt.xlabel('tendency')
    plt.ylabel('perturbation')
    plt.grid(True)
    plt.draw()

if slicer == slicerstart:
    sc.set_xdata(tens)
    sc.set_ydata(pert)
    plt.xlabel('tendency')
    plt.ylabel('perturbation')
    plt.grid(True)
    plt.draw()
else:
    update_scatter(sc, tens, pert)

plt.savefig('sc_test.png')

but this doesn't work because 'set_xdata' is no attribute for 'scatter'. I hope you can help me :)

share|improve this question
    
Moving the 'savefig'-statement outside the for-loop makes it faster and it seems that scatter is very slow: https://github.com/matplotlib/matplotlib/pull/2156 –  smurd May 6 at 9:02
1  
If you are not changing the size of your markers with in a single plot, use plot with no connecting line, it will be much faster. In plot every marker is assumed to be identical, in scatter each marker can have a different size and color so there is significantly more overhead in drawing it. –  tcaswell May 6 at 14:14
    
And if you dig down into PathCollection (which is the arstist type that scatter returns) there is a way to move the markers, but I don't recall it off the top of my head. –  tcaswell May 6 at 14:16
    
Thanks a lot tcaswell, this is definitely much faster ;) –  smurd May 7 at 6:55

1 Answer 1

Like tcaswell mentioned, using 'plot' instead of 'scatter' is much faster since i do not want to change the marker in my plots.

So my code looks like:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
...
slicestart = 30 
sliceend = 50
#read some data:
tens_data = ... #3darray 50*321*321
pert = ...      #3darray 50*321*321
for slicer in range(slicestart,sliceend):
    tens = tens_data.data[slicer,:,:]
    plt.plot(tens, pert, linestyle='', color='blue', marker='o', markersize=5, alpha=0.2, markeredgecolor = 'none')
    #linestyle='' suppresses the connecting line between the points --> looks like scatter
    plt.grid(True)
    plt.xlabel('tendency')
    plt.ylabel('perturbation')
    plt.draw()
plt.savefig('sc_test.png')

To reveal the improvement: My 'slow' code took ~80 seceonds to calculate some stuff and generate a plot, the 'fast' code needs only ~15 seconds or even less.

Thank you! - smurd -

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please elaborate on this? An example of how you changed the code in your question would be ideal. As it is, this is just a re-statement of my comment which I did not post as an answer because it was too terse. –  tcaswell May 7 at 12:06

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