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I'm trying to parse my XML in C#.

Here's part of the file that is relevant:

<holder name="wnd_login" width="300" x="20" height="180">...</holder>

Here's the code that is supposed to read it:

while (reader.Read())
{
    if (reader.IsStartElement())
    {
        switch (reader.Name)
        {
            case "holder":
                Holder holder = new Holder(reader.GetAttribute("name"));
                ...
        }
    }
}

I read around that the common mistake was to forget a check to see if the element was a start element. I added it but the GetAttribute still returns null. Any idea?

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Are you sure your reader is located at the 'holder' element? You could be looking at another node (this includes other node types than 'element') on the same depth. –  Marvin Smit Feb 28 '10 at 16:57
    
I think It might be helpful to see the actual xml file in this case. I was able to get the name for this particular node(using your code) with no issues. –  DotNetWala Mar 10 '10 at 21:37
    
That overload of GetAttribute(string) requires the qualified name of the attribute; is this relevant? –  Flynn1179 Jun 1 '10 at 13:03

1 Answer 1

Perhaps you need to get at the XmlNodes first using the XPath notation, and then iterate through the XmlNodes as in like this:

foreach(XmlNode node in XmlNodes){
     if (node["holder"].HasAttribues != null && node["holder"].Attributes.Count >1){
        for (int i = 0; i < node["holder"].Attributes.Count; i++){
             try{
                XmlAttribute attr = node["holder"].Attributes[i];
                if (attr != null){
                     ....
                }
             }catch(XmlException xmlEx){
                // Do something here with this...output to log?
             }
        }
     }
}

Hope this helps, Best regards, Tom.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP is using XmlReader not the DOM. Also I'm not really sure what's going on here in your example. The DOM doesn't require these kinds of gyrations to access attributes nor can I imagine how your catch block would ever be entered. –  Josh Feb 28 '10 at 4:28

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