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My script gets arguments such as

C:\> python lookup.py "sender-ip=10.10.10.10"

And would take sender-ip and find wmi information

Now I added a ping subprocess to pint the machine BEFORE attempting to get wmi information and I get following error

C:\> python lookup.py "sender-ip=10.10.10.10"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "lookup.py", line 10, in <module>
    ["ping", "-n", "1", userIP],
NameError: name 'userIP' is not defined

Then I tried to define userIP global variable at the beginning of the beginning of the program, but I get error

C:\> python lookup.py "sender-ip=10.10.10.10"
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "lookup.py", line 10, in <module>
    ["ping", "-n", "1", userIP],
NameError: global name 'userIP' is not defined

Here is the program(without global declaration)

# import statements
import sys, wmi, subprocess

# subprocess
ping = subprocess.Popen(
    ["ping", "-n", "1", userIP],
    stdout = subprocess.PIPE,
    stderr = subprocess.PIPE
)

# get the arguments and extract user's IP address
argument = sys.argv[1]
attr_map = dict(item.strip().split('=') for item in argument.split(','))
userIP =  attr_map['sender-ip']
print userIP

# can we ping the user's IP address?
out, error = ping.communicate()

# if we cannot ping user's IP address then print error message and exit program
if out.find("Reply from") == -1:
    print userIP, "is NOT pingable."
    sys.exit()

# remaining lines will execute if we can ping user's IP address
c = wmi.WMI(userIP)
for os in c.Win32_OperatingSystem():
  print os.Caption
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need global variable here. Just assign value to userIP before using it:

# import statements
import sys, wmi, subprocess

# get the arguments and extract user's IP address
argument = sys.argv[1]
attr_map = dict(item.strip().split('=') for item in argument.split(','))
userIP =  attr_map['sender-ip']
print userIP

# subprocess
ping = subprocess.Popen(
    ["ping", "-n", "1", userIP],
    stdout = subprocess.PIPE,
    stderr = subprocess.PIPE
)

# can we ping the user's IP address?
out, error = ping.communicate()

# if we cannot ping user's IP address then print error message and exit program
if out.find("Reply from") == -1:
    print userIP, "is NOT pingable."
    sys.exit()

# remaining lines will execute if we can ping user's IP address
c = wmi.WMI(userIP)
for os in c.Win32_OperatingSystem():
  print os.Caption
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