Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the best way to check for the existance of a session variable in ASP.NET C#?

I like to use String.IsNullOrEmpty works for strings and wondered if there was a similar method for Session. Currently the only way I know of is:

 var sSession;
 if (Session["variable"] != null)
 {
     sSession = Session["variable"].ToString();
 }
 else
 {
     sSession = "set this";
     Session["variable"] = sSession;
 }
share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

up vote 65 down vote accepted

To follow on from what others have said. I tend to have two layers:

The core layer. This is within a DLL that is added to nearly all web app projects. In this I have a SessionVars class which does the grunt work for Session state getters/setters. It contains code like the following:

    public class SessionVar
    {
    static HttpSessionState Session
    {
        get
        {
            if (HttpContext.Current == null)
                throw new ApplicationException("No Http Context, No Session to Get!");

            return HttpContext.Current.Session;
        }
    }

    public static T Get<T>(string key)
    {
        if (Session[key] == null)
            return default(T);
        else
            return (T)Session[key];
    }

    public static void Set<T>(string key, T value)
    {
        Session[key] = value;
    }
    }

Note the generics for getting any type.

I then also add Getters/Setters for specific types, especially string since I often prefer to work with string.Empty rather than null for variables presented to Users.

e.g:

public static string GetString(string key)
    {
        string s = Get<string>(key);
        return s == null ? string.Empty : s;
    }

    public static void SetString(string key, string value)
    {
        Set<string>(key, value);
    }

And so on...

I then create wrappers to abstract that away and bring it up to the application model. For example, if we have customer details:

public class CustomerInfo
{
    public string Name
    {
        get
        {
            return SessionVar.GetString("CustomerInfo_Name");
        }
        set
        {
            SessionVar.SetString("CustomerInfo_Name", value);
        }
    }
}

You get the idea right? :)

NOTE: Just had a thought when adding a comment to the accepted answer. Always ensure objects are serializable when storing them in Session when using a state server. It can be all too easy to try and save an object using the generics when on web farm and it go boom. I deploy on a web farm at work so added checks to my code in the core layer to see if the object is serializable, another benefit of encapsulating the Session Getters and Setters :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for providing thorough answers. Very nice! –  Torbjørn Oct 25 '08 at 7:09
    
No problem, HTH :) –  Rob Cooper Oct 25 '08 at 7:26
    
Great approach! I have been using something similar for a long time, but hadn't incorporated generics. This avoids so many problems with different developers creating similar Session variables. –  DOK Oct 25 '08 at 15:01
    
This approach is awesome. Going to start using it a lot. Thanks. –  ryanulit Jul 15 '11 at 14:00

That is pretty much how you do it. However, there is a shorter syntax you can use.

sSession = (string)Session["variable"] ?? "set this";

This is saying if the session variables is null, set sSession to "set this"

share|improve this answer
1  
you can't do this... Session["variable"] is an Object and the compiler will then convert it to a String because sSession is a String, if the Session["variable"] does not exist, it throws an exception! –  balexandre Oct 24 '08 at 20:01
    
You are absolutely correct. I updated the code to cast the string if Session is not null. –  Ely Oct 24 '08 at 20:12

It may make things more elegant to wrap it in a property.

string MySessionVar
{
   get{
      return Session["MySessionVar"] ?? String.Empty;
   }
   set{
      Session["MySessionVar"] = value;
   }
}

then you can treat it as a string.

if( String.IsNullOrEmpty( MySessionVar ) )
{
   // do something
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I do, makes it much easier to access session vars in an app. I tend to make classes for the data, and static properties which do all the null check grunt work. –  Rob Cooper Oct 24 '08 at 20:04
    
What if you are storing an object in the Session and not just a string? –  Aaron Palmer Oct 24 '08 at 21:17
    
See my answer, the use of generics enables type-safety when storing other objects. –  Rob Cooper Oct 25 '08 at 6:49
    
Excuse me, is the 'Session("' part correct? I'm getting errors. –  Jesus Zamora Feb 27 at 15:28
    
It would be in VB. :) changed to square brackets. –  Greg Ogle Feb 28 at 21:47

The 'as' notation in c# 3.0 is very clean. Since all session variables are nullable objects, this lets you grab the value and put it into your own typed variable without worry of throwing an exception. Most objects can be handled this way.

string mySessionVar = Session["mySessionVar"] as string;

My concept is that you should pull your Session variables into local variables and then handle them appropriately. Always assume your Session variables could be null and never cast them into a non-nullable type.

If you need a non-nullable typed variable you can then use TryParse to get that.

int mySessionInt;
if (!int.TryParse(mySessionVar, out mySessionInt)){
   // handle the case where your session variable did not parse into the expected type 
   // e.g. mySessionInt = 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Checking for nothing/Null is the way to do it.

Dealing with object types is not the way to go. Declare a strict type and try to cast the object to the correct type. (And use cast hint or Convert)

 private const string SESSION_VAR = "myString";
 string sSession;
 if (Session[SESSION_VAR] != null)
 {
     sSession = (string)Session[SESSION_VAR];
 }
 else
 {
     sSession = "set this";
     Session[SESSION_VAR] = sSession;
 }

Sorry for any syntax violations, I am a daily VB'er

share|improve this answer

Typically I create SessionProxy with strongly typed properties for items in the session. The code that accesses these properties checks for nullity and does the casting to the proper type. The nice thing about this is that all of my session related items are kept in one place. I don't have to worry about using different keys in different parts of the code (and wondering why it doesn't work). And with dependency injection and mocking I can fully test it with unit tests. If follows DRY principles and also lets me define reasonable defaults.

public class SessionProxy
{
    private HttpSessionState session; // use dependency injection for testability
    public SessionProxy( HttpSessionState session )
    {
       this.session = session;  //might need to throw an exception here if session is null
    }

    public DateTime LastUpdate
    {
       get { return this.session["LastUpdate"] != null
                         ? (DateTime)this.session["LastUpdate"] 
                         : DateTime.MinValue; }
       set { this.session["LastUpdate"] = value; }
    }

    public string UserLastName
    {
       get { return (string)this.session["UserLastName"]; }
       set { this.session["UserLastName"] = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I also like to wrap session variables in properties. The setters here are trivial, but I like to write the get methods so they have only one exit point. To do that I usually check for null and set it to a default value before returning the value of the session variable. Something like this:

string Name
{
   get 
   {
       if(Session["Name"] == Null)
           Session["Name"] = "Default value";
       return (string)Session["Name"];
   }
   set { Session["Name"] = value; }
}

}

share|improve this answer

In my opinion, the easiest way to do this that is clear and easy to read is:

 String sVar = (string)(Session["SessionVariable"] ?? "Default Value");

It may not be the most efficient method, since it casts the default string value even in the case of the default (casting a string as string), but if you make it a standard coding practice, you find it works for all data types, and is easily readable.

For example (a totally bogus example, but it shows the point):

 DateTime sDateVar = (datetime)(Session["DateValue"] ?? "2010-01-01");
 Int NextYear = sDateVar.Year + 1;
 String Message = "The Procrastinators Club will open it's doors Jan. 1st, " +
                  (string)(Session["OpeningDate"] ?? NextYear);

I like the Generics option, but it seems like overkill unless you expect to need this all over the place. The extensions method could be modified to specifically extend the Session object so that it has a "safe" get option like Session.StringIfNull("SessionVar") and Session["SessionVar"] = "myval"; It breaks the simplicity of accessing the variable via Session["SessionVar"], but it is clean code, and still allows validating if null or if string if you need it.

share|improve this answer

If you know it's a string, you can use the String.IsEmptyOrNull() function.

share|improve this answer

Are you using .NET 3.5? Create an IsNull extension method:

public static bool IsNull(this object input)
{
    input == null ? return true : return false;
}

public void Main()
{
   object x = new object();
   if(x.IsNull)
   {
      //do your thing
   }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That could be written: public static bool Is(this object input) { return input == null; } –  James Curran Oct 24 '08 at 19:52
    
You should be careful with extension methods. –  Chris Pietschmann Oct 24 '08 at 20:05
    
Why should I be careful with extension methods? –  Michael Kniskern Oct 24 '08 at 20:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.