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I have a situation where I have a large collection of items stored in HttpApplicationState which internally uses a NameValueCollection to store key-value pairs. By large I mean in the order of hundreds of thousands of string items. In this particular scenario I am also trying to do a batch removal of keys (again, removing large chunks of items by key from the collection) but I am finding that is painfully slow to do.

I wrote the following samples to compare. The first code sample uses a NameValueCollection to remove all values by key:

NameValueCollection collection = new NameValueCollection();

// Setup
for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
{
    collection.Add(i.ToString(), i.ToString());
}

// Remove
for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
{
    collection.Remove(i.ToString());
}

Running this takes an age (in fact I gave up because it took too long). I then compared it with this version which uses a Dictionary<TKey, TValue>:

Dictionary<int, int> collection = new Dictionary<int, int>();

// Setup
for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
{
    collection.Add(i, i);
}

// Remove
for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
{
    collection.Remove(i);
}

The above sample runs so fast it might as well be instant.

So why do two different collections that to me look to do similar things work so differently?

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1 Answer 1

Thanks to the BCL Reference Source I was able to determine why the NameValueCollection.Remove() method was taking so long. The following is a code snippet of the NameObjectCollectionBase.BaseRemove() method which is invoked:

if (name != null) {
    // remove from hashtable
    _entriesTable.Remove(name);

    // remove from array
    for (int i = _entriesArray.Count-1; i >= 0; i--) {
        if (_keyComparer.Equals(name, BaseGetKey(i)))
            _entriesArray.RemoveAt(i);
    }
}

Basically a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> works as a hash table which means that lookup by key is extremely fast. Whereas a NameValueCollection appears to work more like an array where indexes and keys are tracked. By removing hundreds of thousands of keys at a time this method will in fact loop through the entire internal array countless times to find the correct value to remove!

In the end I changed my code to not use a NameValueCollection and instead used a Dictionary<TKey, TValue> instead because of this.

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You've added an answer in the same minute you asked a question. What was the purpose of asking in first place, if you already had an answer ready? –  Tarec May 6 at 16:28
    
+1. @Tarec - I think it is quite reasonable question/answer - there similar question like NVC vs Dictionary, but none goes into perf part. It is ok to answer own question, even accept it if there is no better answers... - also I'd put answer as "community wiki" to be less contentions. –  Alexei Levenkov May 6 at 16:37
    
I'm not against marking it as an answer. I'm against doing it in the same minute the question's been posted and him pretending to have a problem which in fact he's already solved. And on question "why is method x faster than method y" you could always answer: decompile and compare. –  Tarec May 6 at 17:57
1  
Because according to StackOverflow it is OK to answer your own question - why else is there a check-box for such a thing in the question form? I was simply providing this for information for others because this caused me issues which may help others. –  Peter Monks May 7 at 9:30
    
@AlexeiLevenkov I didn't think to mark the answer as Community Wiki as I've never done it before. Happy to do this –  Peter Monks May 7 at 9:45

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