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I know that Python dicts will "leak" when items are removed (because the item's slot will be overwritten with the magic "removed" value)… But will the set class behave the same way? Is it safe to keep a set around, adding and removing stuff from it over time?

Edit: Alright, I've tried it out, and here's what I found:

>>> import gc
>>> gc.collect()
0
>>> nums = range(1000000)
>>> gc.collect()
0
### rsize: 20 megs
### A baseline measurement
>>> s = set(nums)
>>> gc.collect()
0
### rsize: 36 megs
>>> for n in nums: s.remove(n)
>>> gc.collect()
0
### rsize: 36 megs
### Memory usage doesn't drop after removing every item from the set…
>>> s = None
>>> gc.collect()
0
### rsize: 20 megs
### … but nulling the reference to the set *does* free the memory.
>>> s = set(nums)
>>> for n in nums: s.remove(n)
>>> for n in nums: s.add(n)
>>> gc.collect()
0
### rsize: 36 megs
### Removing then re-adding keys uses a constant amount of memory…
>>> for n in nums: s.remove(n)
>>> for n in nums: s.add(n+1000000)
>>> gc.collect()
0
### rsize: 47 megs
### … but adding new keys uses more memory.
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2  
Could you substantiate what you mean when you say that Python dicts will "leak"? Perhaps a reference to another source? –  Greg Hewgill Feb 28 '10 at 4:13
2  
AFAIK dicts don't really leak - from time to time (when you set new items for instance) the dummies that replace removed values are purget –  Eli Bendersky Feb 28 '10 at 4:15
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, set is basically a hash table just like dict -- the differences at the interface don't imply many differences "below" it. Once in a while, you should copy the set -- myset = set(myset) -- just like you should for a dict on which many additions and removals are regularly made over time.

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So does dict leak? –  Anurag Uniyal Feb 28 '10 at 4:47
1  
@Anurag, dict can consume growing amount of memory and slow things down if you keep adding and removing keys in a long-running program. –  Alex Martelli Feb 28 '10 at 5:00
1  
Calling this behavior "leak" is over-simplifying and misleading, but the point is that making a fresh copy once in a while for a high-churn dict or set can save memory and speed things up! –  Alex Martelli Feb 28 '10 at 5:01
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For questions like these it is often best to run a quick experiment like this one and see what happens:

s = set()
for a in range(1000):
  for b in range(10000000):
    s.add(b)
  for b in range(10000000):
    s.remove(b)

What docs and people say and what behaviour actually is are often at odds. If this is important for you, test it. Don't rely on others.

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For the record I'm seeing no evidence of a leak in that code. Memory use jumped up once and then stayed flat. –  JUST MY correct OPINION Feb 28 '10 at 4:26
    
normally I'd agree… But when the person doing the telling is Alex Martelli, I'm going to just go ahead and believe him. –  David Wolever Feb 28 '10 at 4:27
    
yes, that's the problem - at the end (after all the stuff has been removed), it should drop down again. And being a GC'd language, it's harder to know when all the memory that could be reclaimed has been reclaimed. –  David Wolever Feb 28 '10 at 4:29
    
@David Wolever - the test needs to be altered according to what you're testing for. The point was that you need to test, not that this particular test was the one to run. ;) –  JUST MY correct OPINION Feb 28 '10 at 4:34
    
Alright, well, I've run some tests - see my edits. –  David Wolever Feb 28 '10 at 4:58
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