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Assume I have a base class that stores a reference to some class Bar:

class FooBase
{
public:
  FooBase( Bar &ctx ) : _barCtx( ctx ) {};
  virtual ~FooBase() {};

  // Some other functions

protected:
  Bar &_barCtx;
};

What I'd like to do is add a level of inheritance on top of this, where class Foo<T> will add some functionality.

template< typename T >
class Foo : public FooBase
{
public:
  Foo( Bar &ctx ) : FooBase( ctx ) {};
  bool doSomething( int a );
};

Then, there are some instances of Foo<T> that need to offer a different version of doSomething(), so template specialization is used. The problem is, in each specialized version of Foo<>, I have to re implement the constructor and pass the reference of Bar to the super class. This is basically copy and paste code, which I'd like to avoid.

class Baz;

template<>
class Foo<Baz> : public FooBase
{
public:
  Foob( Bar &ctx ) : FooBase( ctx ) {};
  bool doSomething( std::string &str, int x, float g );
};

The point of this exercise is to offer a different type of doSomething(), with a different signature. So, without using C++11 (Because I'm stuck on GCC 4.6.3), is there a way to avoid this duplication of code? Or, is there a better way of offering a different doSomething()?

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I'd like to understand your problem a little better. What problem is having different signatures of doSomething solving here (in this case "it doesn't look like a duck" like it normally would when using templates). –  Mark B May 6 '14 at 18:39
    
Is the only thing you are trying avoid duplicating that bit of the constructor? The reason I ask is that I think you could use the CRTP, and create a class above FooBase, but the extra complexity may not be worth it. –  kec May 6 '14 at 18:39
    
is it possible to make doSomething a non-member function? That would bypass the problem. (Making a member also called doSomething that calls the free doSomething is trivial, obviously) –  Mooing Duck May 6 '14 at 18:45
    
@MooingDuck: The problem here is that FooBase has a reference to Bar, which doSomething() requires. If I was to pass Bar along, it would add to the parameter list, which I'm trying to avoid. The real problem has more parameters in doSomething() and what I posted above is a simplified version of it. –  MarkP May 6 '14 at 18:47
    
@MarkP You seem to be trying to avoid several things which are not normally avoided here. –  Mooing Duck May 6 '14 at 18:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I actually think a SFINAE approach is better, but if that doesn't work for you for some reason, then specializing individual member functions of a class template might work for you. However, you'll have to declare all overloads in the generic template, then provide the definitions as appropriate. This will make sure that you will get link errors if you call the wrong overloads.

The other option is to use CRTP. That approach is shown further below.

Member specialization approach:

#include <string>

class Bar {};

class FooBase
{
public:
  FooBase( Bar &ctx ) : _barCtx( ctx ) {};
  virtual ~FooBase() {};
protected:
  Bar &_barCtx;
};

template< typename T >
class Foo : public FooBase
{
public:
  Foo( Bar &ctx ) : FooBase( ctx ) {};
  bool doSomething( int a ) { return true; }
  // Declared, but not defined.
  bool doSomething( std::string &str, int x, float g );
};

class Baz {};

// Declared, but not defined.
template <>
bool
Foo<Baz>::doSomething(int i);

template <>
bool
Foo<Baz>::doSomething(std::string &str, int x, float g) {
    return true;
}

int main() {
    Bar b;
    Foo<int> f1(b);
    std::string s;

    f1.doSomething(1); // Compiles.
    // f1.doSomething(s, 1, 3.14f); // Link error.

    Foo<Baz> f2(b);
    // f2.doSomething(1); // Link error.
    f2.doSomething(s, 1, 3.14f); // Compiles.
}

CRTP approach:

#include <string>

class Bar {};
class Baz {};

template <typename T>
class Spec {
    public:
        bool doSomething( int a );
};

template <>
class Spec<Baz> {
    public:
        bool doSomething( std::string &str, int x, float g );
};

class FooBase {
    public:
        FooBase( Bar &ctx ) : _barCtx( ctx ) {};
        virtual ~FooBase() {};
    protected:
        Bar &_barCtx;
};

template< typename T >
class Foo : public FooBase, public Spec<T> {
    public:
        Foo( Bar &ctx ) : FooBase( ctx ) {};
};

template <typename T>
bool Spec<T>::doSomething( int a ) {
    Foo<T> *fp = static_cast<Foo<T> *>(this);
    return true;
}

bool Spec<Baz>::doSomething( std::string &str, int x, float g ) {
    Foo<Baz> *fp = static_cast<Foo<Baz> *>(this);
    return true;
}

int main() {

    Bar b;
    std::string s;

    Foo<int> f1(b);
    f1.doSomething(1);

    Foo<Baz> f2(b);
    f2.doSomething(s, 1, 3.14f);
}
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1  
GCC then states the error: error: template-id 'doSomething<>' for 'bool Foo<Baz>::doSomething(std::string &, int, float)' does not match any template declaration. If I'm understanding this correctly, even though I'm overloading doSomething to have a different signature, the compiler cannot match the two up? –  MarkP May 6 '14 at 18:20
    
@MarkP: Ah, I see now that you actually want to change the signature of doSomething. –  kec May 6 '14 at 18:33
    
@MarkP: Can you have both overloads in the generic version of the template? –  kec May 6 '14 at 18:34
    
that function needs a return type –  cppguy May 6 '14 at 18:36
1  
@MarkP: Yes. If you goal is just to save duplicating that single ctor, then it'll be hard I think to find a solution that doesn't involve more code than that. The other option is to use CRTP to factor out the specialization. –  kec May 6 '14 at 18:55

Instead of specialising Foo, you could supply every overload, and then enable the relevant overloads with SFINAE:

template< typename T >
class Foo : public FooBase
{
public:
  Foo( Bar &ctx ) : FooBase( ctx ) {};

  template<
    typename U = T,
    typename = typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<U, Baz>::value>::type>
  bool doSomething( int a )
  {
      std::cout << "doSomething( int a )\n";
  }

  template<
      typename U = T,
      typename = typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<U, Baz>::value>::type>
  bool doSomething( std::string &str, int x, float g )
  {
      std::cout << "doSomething( std::string &str, int x, float g )\n";
  }
};

(Since you can't use C++11, replace std::enable_if and std::is_same with boost versions or your own versions.)

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Actually... this requires C++11 to work (even with the C++11 standard library things replaced). I'm looking for a workaround now. –  Mankarse May 6 '14 at 18:44
    
Even so, this does work with the C++11 features present in gcc 4.6. Live Example. –  Mankarse May 6 '14 at 18:47

This really seems like the wrong place for using template specialization. The templated type is not being used anywhere in the declaration, so it comes off as completely arbitrary.

I would suggest using other techniques

1) Define an abstract base type for your inputs, and have doSomething take in any implementation of that.

bool doSomething(DoSomethingParamsBase* params);

or

2) Use an enumerated MODE param with variadic params following

bool doSomething(MODE mode...);
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