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I dropped my laptop while Windows was preparing to hibernate and as a result, I got a head crash on the hard drive. (Teaches me to get a hard drive and/or laptop with a freefall sensor next time around.) Anyway, running SpinRite to try to recover the data has resulted in all the spare sectors on the disk to all be all used up for all the recoverable sectors so far. SpinRite is still going right now, but since there won't be anymore spare sectors to be used, I think it'll be a fruitless exercise except to tell me where all the bad sectors are.

Anyway, I'm planning on writing an application to try to salvage data from the hard drive. From my past forays into defragging, I know that I can use FSCTL_GET_RETRIEVAL_POINTERS to figure out the logical cluster numbers for any given file.

How do I go about trying to read the sectors for that actual cluster? My digging through MSDN's listing for Disk, File, and Volume device control codes hasn't had anything jump out at me as the way I get to the actual cluster data.

Should I not even bother trying to read at that low level? Should I instead be doing SetFilePointer() and ReadFile() calls to get to the appropriate cluster sized offsets into the file and read cluster sized chunks?

If the file I'm trying to read has a bad sector, will NTFS mark the entire file as bad and prevent me from accessing the file in the future? If so how do I tell NTFS not to mark the file as bad or dead? (Remember that the HD is now out of spare sectors to be remapped.)

Should I dust off my *nix knowledge and figure out how to read from /dev/ ?

Update: I found the answer to my own question. :-) The solution is doing SetFilePointer() and ReadFile() on the volume handle rather than on the file handle.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found the answer to my own question. :-) The solution is doing SetFilePointer() and ReadFile() on the volume handle rather than on the file handle.

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Does SetFilePointer really work on the volume handle? I didn't know that... –  Mehrdad Mar 20 '11 at 6:35
    
can you share the code? there's some math i'm doing wrong.. –  lalli Sep 16 '11 at 5:46

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