Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to write a C function that computes the minimum value from n inputs, and inserts them in ascending order in an array. Nothing special about the inputs. All positive and < 100. The tricky part is that the results are coming from a blocking MPI_Recv(), and the output not only has to compute the current minimum from n inputs, but also needs to keep track of which values were already inserted in the result array, so that they can be considerations for future groups of n inputs.

In short, MPI master splits up the masterArray (filled with random integers) into subArrays. The slaves sort the subArrays and return it to the master. The master then has to stitch back together the sorted subArrays into one sorted finalArray(unless I can reuse the masterArray). The master gets n subArrays, depending on the number of slaves, needs to pick out, say the first time, the smallest of the n values from the n arrays, and then needs to advance the pointer to the array that was picked from, so that value won't be considered anymore. This needs to do until all the values were transferred in ascending order into the finalArray.

The way I stored the sorted subArrays, as they came in from the master's Recv was to memcpy() the temp arrays every chunkSize elements, where chunkSize = ARRAY_SIZE/(nprocs-1) into a 1D array I called, semiSortedArrays.

First thing, I am not quite sure how you define a function that accepts n values. I am having trouble keeping track of all the pointers and how to pass n parameters to a function call. I'd really appreciate some help, as I am confused.

Many thanks, Scott

share|improve this question

closed as unclear what you're asking by xxbbcc, Eric Lippert, Hristo Iliev, Kerrek SB, iStimple May 6 at 23:16

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
TL;DR but where's your code that needs looking at? –  xxbbcc May 6 at 21:33
    
Errr why is this related to sorting? MPI has a reduce method that can do this in one call. mpitutorial.com/mpi-reduce-and-allreduce: "MPI_MIN – Returns the minimum element." –  luk32 May 6 at 21:38
    
A function that accepts n values int *array; array = malloc(7); void func1(int *a); and so on. Do you have some code that you have tried? –  ryyker May 6 at 21:38
    
Oh, I doesn't compute (I'm not even sure if this should be called computing) minimal value from n inputs... It is supposed to sort minimum values from n input vectors. I guess... –  luk32 May 6 at 21:47
    
Isn't this just a mergesort? –  dj bazzie wazzie May 6 at 21:50

1 Answer 1

First thing, I am not quite sure how you define a function that accepts n values.

Don't try. Make a method that takes a pointer to the first element of an array of values, and an integer count to state what n is.

I am having trouble keeping track of all the pointers

I don't doubt it. C is tricky that way.

I'd really appreciate some help, as I am confused.

My first bit of advice is: delete this question and then ask a more focussed technical question about actual code.

The tricky part is that the results are coming from a blocking MPI_Recv(), and the output not only has to compute the current minimum from n inputs, but also needs to keep track of which values were already inserted in the result array, so that they can be considerations for future groups of n inputs.

My second bit of advice is: before you write another line of code, write a specification. Try to write your specification in terms of one or more functions, each of which takes values, does not mutate those values, and produces a result depending solely on the values that were input. Try to make the functions small enough and clear enough that they can be understood and tested independently.

Such a function is called a pure function, and it is far easier to reason about pure functions than it is to reason about functions that modify their arguments.

Once you have that specification written then you can carefully write the code to match the specification. You might end up making a lot of copies of state. That's fine. Once the code is correct and passing your extensive test suite, then you can try to figure out how to make it faster or do mutations or whatever.

In short:

  • Design
  • Implement
  • Test
  • Optimize

in that order.

share|improve this answer
    
So, to give some of my code I am struggling with, here is the function def that attempts to find the minimum, but is buggy: int minimum(int *array, int size) { int minimum, i, location=1; minimum = array[0]; for(i = 0 ; i < size ; i++) { if(array[i] < minimum) { minimum = array[i]; location = i+1; } } printf("Minimum element %d is present at location %d and it's value is %d.\n", i, location-1, minimum); return minimum; } –  user3583629 May 7 at 1:18
    
for(k=0; k<ARRAY_SIZE; k++) { for(slave=1, index=0; slave<nprocs; slave++) { MPI_Recv(sortedSubArray, chunkSize, MPI_INT, slave, tag, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &status); memcpy(&semiSortedArray[index], sortedSubArray, sizeof(int) * chunkSize); memset(sortedSubArray, 0, chunkSize); ... position = minimum(comparator, nprocs-1); final[slave-1] = semiSortedArray[position]; //Push the index to the next subArray index += chunkSize; } } –  user3583629 May 7 at 1:29
    
Start a new question and delete this one. Make sure the new question is specific. I can't find my bugs is not a specific question. –  Eric Lippert May 7 at 14:17
    
@user3583629: Also please read meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/253787/… –  Eric Lippert May 7 at 16:20

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.