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I have the following question:

Write a function bubble_sort(arr) which will sort an array of integers using the "bubble sort"

And this is the answer to it:

def bubble_sort(arr)
  sorted = false
  until sorted
    sorted = true
    (arr.count - 1).times do |i|
      if arr[i] > arr[i + 1]
        arr[i], arr[i + 1] = arr[i + 1], arr[i]
        sorted = false
      end
    end
  end

  arr
end

1) I am having trouble understanding these lines:

sorted = false
      until sorted
        sorted = true
sorted = false

What is going on here?

2) When I tried to arrive at the solution I tried using while i < arr.length rahter than (arr.count - 1).times do |i| is there a reason to use the latter?

3) Also when I tried to come up with my own solution before looking at the answer I kept getting an error on the if (arr[i] < arr[i+1]) part of the code that read comparison of Fixnum with nil failed (ArgumentError) why might this be?

This was my code:

def bubble_sort(arr)
x = []
i = 0
    while i < arr.length
        k = arr[i]
        if (arr[i] < arr[i+1])
            x.push(k)
        end
        i += 1
    end
x
end

y = [1,3,5,7,2,4,6,8]
puts bubble_sort(y)
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  1. All the business with setting sorted to true and false is because a single loop over the array won't be enough to sort it. The variable is set to false whenever at least one change needs to be made, so the function won't exit until it's done.
  2. Using while i < arr.length is fine--using times is just a little terser since it handles incrementing i for you.
  3. However, you need to do while i < arr.length - 1 to avoid that error. The reason is that at the end of the loop, you'll access arr[i+1], which will return nil if you're at the end of the array.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
  1. Until sorted will loop until sorted is evaluated to true. Ruby conditionals treat nil and false as false values and any other object or value as true. So the loop will run until the sorted variable is true, which will happen when arr[i] is not greater than arr[i + 1].

  2. Both can work. Which do you think is more expressive / easier to read?

  3. You're code is looping until i = length - 1, but you have an if that reads arr[i + 1]. i + 1 will equal the length of the array, which because arrays in ruby are 0 indexed will not contain anything and return nil. The error is happening when you try to compare a fixnum with nil. Try this in a console to experiment: 1 - nil You should get the same error.

Hope that helps!

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