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How do I perform the SQL Join equivalent in MongoDB?

For example say you have two collections (users and comments) and I want to pull all the comments with pid=444 along with the user info for each.

comments
  { uid:12345, pid:444, comment="blah" }
  { uid:12345, pid:888, comment="asdf" }
  { uid:99999, pid:444, comment="qwer" }

users
  { uid:12345, name:"john" }
  { uid:99999, name:"mia"  }

Is there a way to pull all the comments with a certain field (eg. ...find({pid:444}) ) and the user information associated with each comment in one go?

At the moment, I am first getting the comments which match my criteria, then figuring out all the uid's in that result set, getting the user objects, and merging them with the comment's results. Seems like I am doing it wrong.

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8 Answers 8

Here's an example of a "join" * Actors and Movies collections:

http://cookbook.mongodb.org/patterns/pivot/

It makes use of .mapReduce() method

* join - an alternative to join in document-oriented databases

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9  
-1, This is NOT joining data from two collections. It is using data from a single collection (actors) pivoting data around. So that things that were keys are now values and values are now keys... very different than a JOIN. –  Evan Teran May 22 '12 at 17:44
9  
This exactly what you have to do, MongoDB is not relational but document oriented. MapReduce allows to play with data with big performance (you can use cluster etc....) but even for simple cases, its very useful ! –  Thomas Decaux Jun 17 '12 at 19:16

We can merge/join all data inside only one collection with a easy function in few lines using the mongodb client console, and now we could be able of perform the desired query. Below a complete example,

.- Authors:

db.authors.insert([
    {
        _id: 'a1',
        name: { first: 'orlando', last: 'becerra' },
        age: 27
    },
    {
        _id: 'a2',
        name: { first: 'mayra', last: 'sanchez' },
        age: 21
    }
]);

.- Categories:

db.categories.insert([
    {
        _id: 'c1',
        name: 'sci-fi'
    },
    {
        _id: 'c2',
        name: 'romance'
    }
]);

.- Books

db.books.insert([
    {
        _id: 'b1',
        name: 'Groovy Book',
        category: 'c1',
        authors: ['a1']
    },
    {
        _id: 'b2',
        name: 'Java Book',
        category: 'c2',
        authors: ['a1','a2']
    },
]);

.- Book lending

db.lendings.insert([
    {
        _id: 'l1',
        book: 'b1',
        date: new Date('01/01/11'),
        lendingBy: 'jose'
    },
    {
        _id: 'l2',
        book: 'b1',
        date: new Date('02/02/12'),
        lendingBy: 'maria'
    }
]);

.- The magic:

db.books.find().forEach(
    function (newBook) {
        newBook.category = db.categories.findOne( { "_id": newBook.category } );
        newBook.lendings = db.lendings.find( { "book": newBook._id  } ).toArray();
        newBook.authors = db.authors.find( { "_id": { $in: newBook.authors }  } ).toArray();
        db.booksReloaded.insert(newBook);
    }
);

.- Get the new collection data:

db.booksReloaded.find().pretty()

.- Response :)

{
    "_id" : "b1",
    "name" : "Groovy Book",
    "category" : {
        "_id" : "c1",
        "name" : "sci-fi"
    },
    "authors" : [
        {
            "_id" : "a1",
            "name" : {
                "first" : "orlando",
                "last" : "becerra"
            },
            "age" : 27
        }
    ],
    "lendings" : [
        {
            "_id" : "l1",
            "book" : "b1",
            "date" : ISODate("2011-01-01T00:00:00Z"),
            "lendingBy" : "jose"
        },
        {
            "_id" : "l2",
            "book" : "b1",
            "date" : ISODate("2012-02-02T00:00:00Z"),
            "lendingBy" : "maria"
        }
    ]
}
{
    "_id" : "b2",
    "name" : "Java Book",
    "category" : {
        "_id" : "c2",
        "name" : "romance"
    },
    "authors" : [
        {
            "_id" : "a1",
            "name" : {
                "first" : "orlando",
                "last" : "becerra"
            },
            "age" : 27
        },
        {
            "_id" : "a2",
            "name" : {
                "first" : "mayra",
                "last" : "sanchez"
            },
            "age" : 21
        }
    ],
    "lendings" : [ ]
}

I hope this lines can help you.

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3  
surprised I'm the first person to up-vote this –  Baldy May 22 '14 at 18:51
1  
i'm wondering if this same code can be ran using doctrine mongodb? –  abbood May 30 '14 at 13:46
    
What happens when one of the references objects gets an update? Does that update automatically reflect in the book object? Or does that loop need to run again? –  balupton Jun 4 '14 at 5:55
    
This is fine as long as your data is small. It is going to bring each book content to your client and then fetch each category, lending and authors one by one. The moment your books are in thousands, this would go really really slow. A better technique probably would be to use aggregation pipeline and output the merged data into a separate collection. Let me get back to it again. I will add that an answer. –  Sandeep Giri Jun 19 '14 at 15:31

This page on the official mongodb site addresses exactly this question:

http://docs.mongodb.org/ecosystem/tutorial/model-data-for-ruby-on-rails/

"When we display our list of stories, we'll need to show the name of the user who posted the story. If we were using a relational database, we could perform a join on users and stores, and get all our objects in a single query. But MongoDB does not support joins and so, at times, requires bit of denormalization. Here, this means caching the 'username' attribute. [...] Relational purists may be feeling uneasy already, as if we were violating some universal law. [...]"

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30  
Then why so many people love MongoDB. I dont get it :| –  dudelgrincen Sep 15 '13 at 15:47
19  
@dudelgrincen it's a paradigm shift from normalization and relational databases. The goal of a NoSQL is to read and write from the database very quickly. With BigData you're going to have scads of application and front end servers with lower numbers on DBs. You're expected to do millions of transactions a second. Offload the heavy lifting from the database and put it onto the application level. If you need deep analysis, you run an integration job that puts your data into an OLAP database. You shouldn't be getting many deep queries from your OLTP dbs anyway. –  Snowburnt Nov 4 '13 at 1:53
7  
@dudelgrincen I should also say that it's not for every project or design. If you have something that works in a SQL type database why change it? If you can't massage your schema to work with noSQL, then don't. –  Snowburnt Nov 12 '13 at 0:30
2  
Migrations and a constantly evolving schemas are also a lot easier to manage on a NoSQL system. –  justin May 6 '14 at 20:09

It depends on what you're trying to do.

You currently have it set up as a normalized database, which is fine, and the way you are doing it is appropriate.

However, there are other ways of doing it.

You could have a posts collection that has imbedded comments for each post with references to the users that you can iteratively query to get. You could store the user's name with the comments, you could store them all in one document.

The thing with NoSQL is it's designed for flexible schemas and very fast reading and writing. In a typical Big Data farm the database is the biggest bottleneck, you have fewer database engines than you do application and front end servers...they're more expensive but more powerful, also hard drive space is very cheap comparatively. Normalization comes from the concept of trying to save space, but it comes with a cost at making your databases perform complicated Joins and verifying the integrity of relationships, performing cascading operations. All of which saves the developers some headaches if they designed the database properly.

With NoSQL, if you accept that redundancy and storage space aren't issues because of their cost (both in processor time required to do updates and hard drive costs to store extra data), denormalizing isn't an issue (for embedded arrays that become hundreds of thousands of items it can be a performance issue, but most of the time that's not a problem). Additionally you'll have several application and front end servers for every database cluster. Have them do the heavy lifting of the joins and let the database servers stick to reading and writing.

TL;DR: What you're doing is fine, and there are other ways of doing it. Check out the mongodb documentation's data model patterns for some great examples. http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/data-modeling/

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3  
"Normalization comes from the concept of trying to save space" I question this. IMHO normalization comes from the concept of avoiding redundancy. Say you store the name of a user along with a blogpost. What if she marries? In a not normalized model you will have to wade through all posts and change the name. In a normalized model you usually change ONE record. –  Daniel Khan Nov 27 '13 at 13:28
    
@DanielKhan preventing redundancy and saving space are similar concepts, but on re-analysis I do agree, redundancy is the root cause for this design. I'll reword. Thanks for the note. –  Snowburnt Nov 27 '13 at 19:15

You can run SQL queries including join on MongoDB with mongo_fdw from Postgres.

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Name of the wrapper please? The link gives a 404. –  Cymbals Jun 14 '13 at 13:33
    
@Cymbals link is corrected –  metdos Jun 14 '13 at 15:22
    
Thank you metdos! –  Cymbals Jun 14 '13 at 15:34

playORM can do it for you using S-SQL(Scalable SQL) which just adds partitioning such that you can do joins within partitions.

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There is a specification that a lot of drivers support that's called DBRef.

DBRef is a more formal specification for creating references between documents. DBRefs (generally) include a collection name as well as an oject id. Most developers only use DBRefs if the collection can change from one document to the next. If your referenced collection will always be the same, the manual references outlined above are more efficient.

Source

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You have to do it the way you described. MongoDB is a non-relational database and doesn't support joins.

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4  
Seems wrong performance wise coming from a sql server background, but its maybe not that bad with a document db? –  terjetyl Jul 15 '10 at 18:20
2  
from a sql server background as well, I would appreciate MongoDB taking a 'result set' (with selected returned fields) as input for a new query in one go, much like nested queries in SQL –  Stijn Sanders Nov 26 '10 at 23:17
    
@terjetyl You have to really plan for it. What fields are you going be presenting on the front end, if it's a limited amount in an individual view then you take those as embedded documents. The key is to not need to do joins. If you want to do deep analysis, you do it after the fact in another database. Run a job that transforms the data into an OLAP cube for optimal performance. –  Snowburnt Nov 4 '13 at 1:56

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