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I'm trying to understand multi threading in C++. In the following bit of code, will the deque 'tempData' declared in retrieve() always have every element processed once and only once, or could there be multiple copies of tempData across multiple threads with stale data, causing some elements to be processed multiple times? I'm not sure if passing by reference actually causes there to be only one copy in this case?

static mutex m;

void AudioAnalyzer::analysisThread(deque<shared_ptr<AudioAnalysis>>& aq)
{

    while (true)
    {
        m.lock();
        if (aq.empty())
        {
            m.unlock();
            break;
        }
        auto aa = aq.front();
        aq.pop_front();
        m.unlock();

        if (false) //testing
        {
            retrieveFromDb(aa);
        }
        else
        {
            analyzeAudio(aa);
        }
    }
}

void AudioAnalyzer::retrieve()
{
    deque<shared_ptr<AudioAnalysis>>tempData(data);
    vector<future<void>> futures;
        for (int i = 0; i < NUM_THREADS; ++i)
    {
        futures.push_back(async(bind(&AudioAnalyzer::analysisThread, this, _1), ref(tempData)));
    }

    for (auto& f : futures)
    {
        f.get();
    }
}
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1  
Yes passing by reference doens't do any copies so your original tempData is shared by all threads. You would better use std::unique_lock. In your case there shouldbn't be any exceptions during access of tempData but this is not good practice in general. I don't see race conditions so your code should be safe. The only thing is that you may not need tempData at all if you pass shared_ptr<AudioAnalysis> to analysisThread directly. As far as I remember std::async doesn't guarandtee that thread will be created so your NUM_THREADS usage is questionable –  AlexT May 7 at 3:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks OK to me.

Threads have shared memory and if the reference to tempData turns up as a pointer in the thread then every thread sees exactly the same pointer value and the same single copy of tempData. [You can check that if you like with a bit of global code or some logging.]

Then the mutex ensures single-threaded access, at least in the threads.


One problem: somewhere there must be a push onto the deque, and that may need to be locked by the mutex as well. [Obviously the push_back onto the futures queue is just local.]

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Assuming retrieve() is only called by one thread, do I need mutex around push_back? –  svenoaks May 7 at 3:52
    
@svenoaks vector of futures is local so no need to synchronize –  AlexT May 7 at 4:02
    
@svenoaks: You're right. The push onto the deque is not shown in this code. See edit. –  david.pfx May 7 at 11:22

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