Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I, like many, constantly have to look up date codes for date formatter. I decided to make a file that will make it easier for me to remember them all. I include a function for readability that I declare like this:

NSString * dateFormatString(NSString * string1, ...) {

    // Parse out Args
    va_list args;
    va_start(args,string1);

    // Set up our Format String
    NSMutableString * formatString = [NSMutableString string];

    // Build Format string
    for (NSString * arg = string1; arg != nil; arg = va_arg(args, NSString*)) {
        [formatString appendString:arg];
    }

    va_end(args);

    return formatString;
}

So, I can then program my NSDateFormatter like this:

dateFormatter.dateFormatString = dateFormatString(DKDayOfWeekFull, @", ", DKMonthNameFull, @" ", DKDayOfMonthComplete, nil);

You could do achieve pretty much the same thing by declaring:

[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@, %@ %@", DKDayOfWeekFull, DKMonthNameFull, DKDayOfMonthComplete];

However, if you're describing a date with more variables like "Sat, Jan 14 2006 at 7:52 AM" it would have to be:

 NSString * dateFormatterString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@, %@ %@ %@ 'at' %@:%@ %@", DKDayOfWeekAbbreviated, DKMonthNameAbbreviated, DKDayOfMonthComplete, DKYearComplete, DKHour12hrComplete, DKMinutes2Digits, DKAmPm];

Which I personally think is a bit more readable like this:

NSString * dateFormatterString = dateFormatString(DKDayOfWeekAbbreviated, @", ", DKMonthNameAbbreviated, @" ", DKDayOfMonthComplete, @" ", DKYearComplete, @"'at' ", DKHour12hrComplete, @":", DKMinutes2Digits, @" ", DKAmPm, nil);

Question

I would prefer a way to iterate through the variables without having to pass nil into the function. Is there another way to iterate through a variable argument list, other than:

for (NSString * arg = string1; arg != nil; arg = va_arg(args, NSString*)) {
    [formatString appendString:arg];
}
share|improve this question
1  
The compiler will warn you of a forgotten nil if you declare your function like this: NSString *dateFormatString(NSString *, ...) NS_REQUIRES_NIL_TERMINATION; –  rob mayoff May 7 at 5:25
    
@RobMayoff - That's perfect! It fills it right in so people won't forget. Thanks! –  Logan May 7 at 5:27

2 Answers 2

I assume you meant to say dateFormatter.dateFormat = ..., since NSDateFormatter has no dateFormatString property.

I assume DKDayOfWeekAbbreviated is a string constant defined as @"E", and DKDayOfWeekFull is @"EEEE", and so on, based on UTS #35.

If that is so, here's a different approach. Define your constants like this:

#define DKDayOfWeekAbbreviated @"E"
#define DKDayOfWeekFull @"EEEE"
#define DKMonthNameFull @"MMMM"
#define DKDayOfMonthComplete @"dd"

Then use compile-time string concatenation to build your strings. The compiler merges two adjacent string constants. For example, "hello " "world" becomes "hello world", and @"hello " @"world" becomes @"hello world". In fact, you can omit the second and later @ characters, so @"hello " "world" becomes @"hello world".

Thus:

dateFormatter.dateFormat = DKDayOfWeekFull ", " DKMonthNameFull " " DKDayOfMonthComplete;

You don't need a helper function or varargs.

share|improve this answer
    
Slick. I always forget that you can append string constants this way. –  rmaddy May 7 at 4:33
    
This is very cool! I didn't know you could do that. Definitely worth an upvote! I have two problems that this causes. 1. I don't get autofill past the first variable. 2. I currently have descriptions declared in my keys using /*! description */ so I can see what each key does while searching. –  Logan May 7 at 4:41

The only way to support variable arguments using the standard C syntax is to do what you are doing.

But you have another option - use an NSArray.

Your function becomes:

NSString * dateFormatString(NSArray *strings) {
    // Set up our Format String
    NSMutableString * formatString = [NSMutableString string];

    // Build Format string
    for (NSString * arg in strings) {
        [formatString appendString:arg];
    }

    return formatString;
}

or simply do:

NSString * dateFormatString(NSArray *strings) {
    return [strings componentsJoinedByString:@""];
}

And you call it like this:

dateFormatter.dateFormatString = dateFormatString(@[ DKDayOfWeekFull, @", ", DKMonthNameFull, @" ", DKDayOfMonthComplete ]);

No need for nil using the modern NSArray syntax.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @rmaddy, do you know how NSString & NSLog get away with it? –  Logan May 7 at 4:28
    
Good question because lots of other methods do need the nil terminator. –  rmaddy May 7 at 4:35
1  
The only thing I can think of is that they parse the format string and count instances of % to know how many args to iterate. –  Logan May 7 at 4:43
1  
It's a little more complicated than just counting % chars, but yes the format string indicates how many arguments follow, hence no need for a nil at the end. Examples: %*.*s consumes three args. %% consumes no args. –  user3386109 May 7 at 4:56
    
More succinctly: [strings componentsJoinedByString:@""] –  rob mayoff May 7 at 5:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.