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In my code below, it stops executing when I hit an exception. How can I get it to re-enter the try statement from where the exception left off? Maybe I am looking for a different way to tackle this without a try-except statement?

import requests
from requests import exceptions

contains_analyst = []

try:
    for x in data:
        r = requests.get(str(x), timeout=10, verify=False)

        if "analyst" in r.text:
            contains_analyst.append("Analyst")
            print "Analyst @ %s" % x
        else:
            contains_analyst.append("NOPERS")
            print "Nopers"

except exceptions.RequestException:
    contains_analyst.append("COULD NOT CONNECT") 
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should put the try/except around only the part whose error you want to trap. In your example, it looks like you want something more like this:

for x in data:
    try:
        r = requests.get(str(x), timeout=10, verify=False)
    except exceptions.RequestException:
        contains_analyst.append("COULD NOT CONNECT") 
    else:
        if "analyst" in r.text:
            contains_analyst.append("Analyst")
            print "Analyst @ %s" % x
        else:
            contains_analyst.append("NOPERS")
            print "Nopers"

Here I use the else clause of the try block to handle the case where no exception is raised (see documentation). In many cases, if you don't need to do anything else after the exception, you could just return at that point and put the following no-exception code in the main function body, reducing indentation a bit:

for x in data:
    try:
        r = requests.get(str(x), timeout=10, verify=False)
    except exceptions.RequestException:
        contains_analyst.append("COULD NOT CONNECT")
        return contains_analyst

    # execution reaches here if no exception
    if "analyst" in r.text:
        contains_analyst.append("Analyst")
        print "Analyst @ %s" % x
    else:
        contains_analyst.append("NOPERS")
        print "Nopers"

Of course, whether it makes sense to return at that point depends on the surrounding context of your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, that makes sense. I don't know why I thought I had to keep the whole try statement as it was...thanks –  Meepl May 7 at 4:07

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