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I need to make countdown timer for every day to 21:00. Counting till live stream. If time is less then 21:00 display the time left and if time is from 21:00-22:00 I would like to display 'streaming right now'. After 22:00 start counting till tomorrow at 21:00.

Any suggestins how to do this?

Here is what I tried so far but it doesn't work well and also if client change the time on his computer the counter will change. I need to fix that on server side so for everyone it will show the same time.

    <script type="text/javascript">
        $(document).ready(function(){
            var curT, tarT, difT;

            curT = new Date().getTime()/1000;
            tarT = new Date('<?php echo (new DateTime('May 05, 2014'))->add(new DateInterval("P1D"))->format('M d, Y');?>, 21:00:00').getTime()/1000;

            init();

            function init(){
                var d,h,m,s;
                difT = tarT - curT;
                function updateT(){
                    s = difT;
                    d = Math.floor(s/86400);
                    s -= d * 86400;
                    h = Math.floor(s/3600);
                    s -= h * 3600;
                    m = Math.floor(s/60);
                    s -= m * 60;
                    s = Math.floor(s);
                }
                function tick(){
                    clearTimeout(timer);
                    updateT();
                    displayT();
                    if(difT>0){
                        difT--;
                        timer = setTimeout(tick,1*1000);
                    } else {
                        $('.timeleft').html('Aukcija u toku...');
                    }
                }
                function displayT(){
                    var out;
                    out = h+":"+m+":"+s;
                    $('.timeleft').html(out);
                }
                var timer = setTimeout(tick,1*1000);
            }
        });
    </script>
share|improve this question
1  
Please share your code whatever you tried.. –  Rohit Batham May 7 at 8:23
    
Recheck my comment, now it should satisfy you. –  Heanz May 7 at 9:16
    
It's probably best if you pass the start of the streaming time to the client as a UTC time value, then the client can convert that to a local time and count down to that. –  RobG May 7 at 9:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you need a combination of both scripts from above, I combined them for you: http://jsfiddle.net/69TAf/

  • Reads out the real time from GMT Server
  • Clients timezone doesn't matter
  • GMT Server is only pinged once at beginning (for better performance)
  • Added leading zeros so it looks better

Credits to edcs and Miskone!

var date;
var display = document.getElementById('time');

$(document).ready(function() {
    getTime('GMT', function(time){
        date = new Date(time);
    });    
});

setInterval(function() {
    date = new Date(date.getTime() + 1000);

    var currenthours = date.getHours();
    var hours;
    var minutes;
    var seconds;
    if (currenthours != 21){
        if (currenthours < 21) {
            hours = 20 - currenthours;
        } else {
            hours = 21 + (24 - currenthours);
        }
        minutes = 60 - date.getMinutes();
        seconds = 60 - date.getSeconds();

        if (minutes < 10) {
            minutes = '0' + minutes;
        }
        if (seconds < 10) {
            seconds = '0' + seconds;
        }

        display.innerHTML = hours + ':' + minutes + ':' +seconds;
    } else { 
        display.innerHTML = 'LIVE NOW';
    }
}, 1000);

function getTime(zone, success) {
    var url = 'http://json-time.appspot.com/time.json?tz=' + zone,
        ud = 'json' + (+new Date());
    window[ud]= function(o){
        success && success(new Date(o.datetime));
    };
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild((function(){
        var s = document.createElement('script');
        s.type = 'text/javascript';
        s.src = url + '&callback=' + ud;
        return s;
    })());
}

And html:

<div id='time'></div>

If you don't want to ping an external server for getting the time, you can use this fiddle (not working on jsfiddle, since contains php): http://jsfiddle.net/qQ6V3/ - I think it's even better this way.

share|improve this answer

If you need everyone to be counting down from the same time, then you'll need to grab it from a centralised time server. This code does exactly that:

function getTime(zone, success) {
    var url = 'http://json-time.appspot.com/time.json?tz=' + zone,
        ud = 'json' + (+new Date());
    window[ud]= function(o){
        success && success(new Date(o.datetime));
    };
    document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0].appendChild((function(){
        var s = document.createElement('script');
        s.type = 'text/javascript';
        s.src = url + '&callback=' + ud;
        return s;
    })());
}

getTime('GMT', function(time){
    // This is where you do whatever you want with the time:
    alert(time);
});

Source

If you use getTime() instead of grabbing the local time from the client then everyone will be in sync.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hopefully the OP follows the link and discovers that the server is out of quota for free service well before 24hrs is up. Far simpler to just send a time value from the server, then everyone really is in sync. –  RobG May 7 at 9:35
    
Was going to mention something along those lines, but thinking about it, you don't really want to be continuously polling the time server. This is pretty inefficient seeing as you'd need to do an HTTP request - IMO you'd be better off grabbing the time from the server once on load and working from there. –  edcs May 7 at 10:18

you can do something like this :

<div id='time'></div>

and the script :

var display = document.getElementById('time'); 
setInterval(function(){ 
    var date = new Date();
    var currenthours = date.getHours();
    var hours;
    var minutes;
    var secondes;
    if (currenthours != 21){
        if (currenthours < 21)
            hours = 20 - currenthours;
        else hours = 21 + (24 - currenthours);
        minutes = 60 - date.getMinutes();
        secondes = 60 - date.getSeconds();
    display.innerHTML = hours + ':' + minutes + ':' +secondes;
    }
    else display.innerHTML = 'LIVE NOW';
},1000);

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/KbM8D/

share|improve this answer

Lots of answers, one more won't hurt. :-)

I think you are best to pass the start and end of streaming to the client as a UNIX UTC time values in seconds. Then the client can turn that into a local date and count down to that. Using a network time server sounds good, but it means that everyone must use the same time server and you are reliant on the server being available.

if you're going to pass a time at all, it might as well be the start and end according to your server. You can even pass the current time from the server and calculate a time offset to apply at the client. Anyhow, the code…

<script>

var countDown = (function() {
  var startStream;
  var endStream;
  var streamingText = 'streaming right now';
  var updateElement;

  // Pad single digit numbers
  function pad(n) {
    return (n<10?'0':'') + +n;
  }

  // Format a time difference as hh:mm:ss
  // d0 and d1 are date objects, d0 < d1
  function timeDiff(d0, d1) {
    var diff = d1 - d0;
    return pad(diff/3.6e6|0) + ':' + pad((diff%3.6e6)/6e4|0) + ':' + pad(diff%6e4/1000|0);
  }

  // start, end are UNIX UTC time values in seconds for the start and end of streaming
  return function(elementId, start, end) {
    var now = new Date();
    var returnValue;

    // By default, run again just after next full second
    var delay = 1020 - now.getMilliseconds();

    // turn start and end times into local Date objects
    if (start) startStream = new Date(start*1000);
    if (end) endStream = new Date(end*1000);

      // If now is after endStream, add 1 day,
      // Use UTC to avoid daylight saving adjustments
      if (now > endStream) {
        endStream.setUTCHours(endStream.getUTCHours() + 24);
        startStream.setUTCHours(startStream.getUTCHours() + 24);
      }

    // Store the element to write the text to
    if (elementId) updateElement = document.getElementById(elementId);

    // If it's streaming time, return streaming text
    if (now >= startStream && now < endStream) {
      returnValue = streamingText;

      // Run again after streaming end time
      delay = endStream - now;

    } else {
      // Otherwise, count down to startStream
      returnValue = timeDiff(now, startStream);
    }

    // Write the time left or streaming text
    updateElement.innerHTML = returnValue;

    // Call again when appropriate
    setTimeout(countDown, delay);
  };
}());


// Testing code

// Create dates for a local time of 21:00 today
var myStart = new Date();
myStart.setHours(21,0,0,0);
var myEnd = new Date()
myEnd.setHours(22,0,0,0);

// Create UNIX time values for same time as UTC
var startUTCTimeValue = myStart/1000|0
var endUTCTimeValue   = myEnd/1000|0

// Run when page loads
window.onload = function() {
  countDown('foo', startUTCTimeValue, endUTCTimeValue);
}

</script>

<div id="foo"></div>
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