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I want to know what are the differences between NSAutoreleasePool and @autoreleasepool block.I have gone through a number of questions but didn't get any satisfying answer.Till now I came to know that in ARC we can't use NSAutoreleasePool and @autoreleasepool block can be used in both ARC enabled and disabled case.So in what respect they are different internally to behave in that way.

Is it necessary to release the objects in an arc disabled environment even though we are using NSAutoreleasePool or @autoreleasepool block or they will do it automatically?Also,if ARC release memory automatically then why we use @autoreleasepool block.Please give me a brief overview with example.

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From the docs apple says that if you use arc you cannot use NSAutoreleasePool you have to use @autoreleasepool. Look further into developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/… – Sandeep May 7 '14 at 9:23
    
I saw this in the above link: -Important: If you use Automatic Reference Counting (ARC), you cannot use autorelease pools directly. Instead, you use @autoreleasepool blocks. – Imran May 7 '14 at 9:28
    
    
@leo...The difference the link gave I have already mentioned in my question.I wanted to know that is it the only difference or there are others. – Imran May 7 '14 at 9:42
up vote 6 down vote accepted

One difference you mentioned :

In ARC we can't use NSAutoreleasePool and @autoreleasepool block can be used in both ARC enabled and disabled case.

But for yours this statement :

Also,if ARC release memory automatically then why we use @autoreleasepool block

ARC doesn't released memory automatically!!! Its is compile time feature where every object is sent an autorelease and it goes to the local pool. And once its lifetime and scope are over the pool os released itself resulting in release of all objects.

You may refer this blog Are @autoreleasepool Blocks More Efficient?

Is it necessary to release the objects in an arc disabled environment even though we are using NSAutoreleasePool or @autoreleasepool block or they will do it automatically?

Yes you need to release the objects. As per definition of (@/NS)autoreleasepool it doesn't handle your object retain counts but it is used only for this following :

Autorelease pool blocks provide a mechanism whereby you can relinquish ownership of an object, but avoid the possibility of it being deallocated immediately (such as when you return an object from a method).

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Thanks Anoop for the answer.One more question is there i.e. Is it necessary to release the objects in an arc disabled environment even though we are using NSAutoreleasePool or @autoreleasepool block or they will do it automatically? – Imran May 7 '14 at 9:35

The NSAutoreleasePool class is used to support Cocoa’s reference-counted memory management system. An autorelease pool stores objects that are sent a release message when the pool itself is drained.

Also, If you use Automatic Reference Counting (ARC), you cannot use autorelease pools directly. Instead, you use @autoreleasepool blocks. For example, in place of:

NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
// Code benefitting from a local autorelease pool.
[pool release];

You would write:

@autoreleasepool {
    // Code benefitting from a local autorelease pool.
}

@autoreleasepool blocks are more efficient than using an instance of NSAutoreleasePool directly; you can also use them even if you do not use ARC.

You can refer the Apple document for more detail:

https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Cocoa/Reference/Foundation/Classes/NSAutoreleasePool_Class/Reference/Reference.html

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