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I need to replace the standard Overflow function in a ToolStrip to a "More..." button which would then pop up a menu with the overflowed items. Does anyone have any ideas about how to accomplish this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I wrote something very similar to this awhile ago. The code I used is pasted below, and you are free to modify it to suit your needs.

The ToolStripCustomiseMenuItem is basically your "More" button that populates a DropDown Context Menu when clicked. Hope this helps you, at the very least this should be a good starting point…

  public class ToolStripCustomiseMenuItem : ToolStripDropDownButton {
        public ToolStripCustomiseMenuItem()
            : base("Add Remove Buttons") {
            this.Overflow = ToolStripItemOverflow.Always;
            DropDown = CreateCheckImageContextMenuStrip();
        }

    ContextMenuStrip checkImageContextMenuStrip = new ContextMenuStrip();
    internal ContextMenuStrip CreateCheckImageContextMenuStrip() {
        ContextMenuStrip checkImageContextMenuStrip = new ContextMenuStrip();
        checkImageContextMenuStrip.ShowCheckMargin = true;
        checkImageContextMenuStrip.ShowImageMargin = true;
        checkImageContextMenuStrip.Closing += new ToolStripDropDownClosingEventHandler(checkImageContextMenuStrip_Closing);
        checkImageContextMenuStrip.Opening += new CancelEventHandler(checkImageContextMenuStrip_Opening);
        DropDownOpening += new EventHandler(ToolStripAddRemoveMenuItem_DropDownOpening);
        return checkImageContextMenuStrip;
    }

    void checkImageContextMenuStrip_Opening(object sender, CancelEventArgs e) {

    }

    void ToolStripAddRemoveMenuItem_DropDownOpening(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        DropDownItems.Clear();
        if (this.Owner == null) return;
        foreach (ToolStripItem ti in Owner.Items) {
            if (ti is ToolStripSeparator) continue;
            if (ti == this) continue;
            MyToolStripCheckedMenuItem itm = new MyToolStripCheckedMenuItem(ti);
            itm.Checked = ti.Visible;
            DropDownItems.Add(itm);
        }
    }

    void checkImageContextMenuStrip_Closing(object sender, ToolStripDropDownClosingEventArgs e) {
        if (e.CloseReason == ToolStripDropDownCloseReason.ItemClicked) {
            e.Cancel = true;
        }
    }
}

internal class MyToolStripCheckedMenuItem : ToolStripMenuItem {
    ToolStripItem tsi;
    public MyToolStripCheckedMenuItem(ToolStripItem tsi)
        : base(tsi.Text) {
        this.tsi = tsi;
        this.Image = tsi.Image;
        this.CheckOnClick = true;
        this.CheckState = CheckState.Checked;
        CheckedChanged += new EventHandler(MyToolStripCheckedMenuItem_CheckedChanged);
    }

    void MyToolStripCheckedMenuItem_CheckedChanged(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        tsi.Visible = this.Checked;
    }

}
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You can trap the paint event on the button by calling

toolStrip1.OverflowButton.Paint += new PaintEventHandler(OverflowButton_Paint);

Which in theory should allow you to make it say "More...", but I was unable to set the width of the Overflow Button to be anything but the (narrow) default width.

Also, another idea was that you can trap VisibleChanged on the OverflowButton then manually inject a split button into the toolstrip. The tricky part is figuring out where to put that button.

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