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I want to make "grammatically correct" lists using CSS. This is what I have so far:

The <li> tags are displayed horizontally with commas after them.

li { display: inline; list-style-type: none; }

li:after { content: ", "; }

That works, but I want the "last-child" to have a period instead of a comma. And, if possible, I'd like to put "and" before the "last-child" as well. The lists I'm styling are generated dynamically, so I can't just give the "last-children" a class. You can't combine pseudo-elements, but that's basically the effect I want to achieve.

li:last-child li:before { content: "and "; }

li:last-child li:after { content: "."; }

How do I make this work?

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3  
you really shouldnt be using css for this. –  Funky Dude Feb 28 '10 at 16:09
2  
I must agree with Funky Dude a bit. It would be better to do this in the HTML (or codebehind if it's more than plain HTML). CSS is for formatting :) –  Zyphrax Feb 28 '10 at 16:18
11  
I...personally, tend to argue that, in a list, the formatting is a nicety, not a necessity. That being the case using CSS allows for more simple additions or removals from the list, than using the html or server-side coding. But I'm strange like that, sometimes, and, honestly ymmv, etc... =) –  David Thomas Feb 28 '10 at 19:02
3  
And +1 for using the Oxford Comma! :) –  Brandon Rhodes Nov 15 '11 at 13:36
2  
+1 for "+1 for Oxford Comma". Never heard about it (I'm not native). But quick wiki lookup says it's natural, because it's not used in many languages. Funny what one can learn stack-googling CSS issues ;) –  jakub.g Jul 12 '12 at 12:46
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6 Answers

This works :) (I hope multi-browser, Firefox likes it)

<html>
 <head>
  <style type="text/css">
   li { display: inline; list-style-type: none; }
   li:after { content: ", "; }
   li:last-child:before { content: "and "; }
   li:last-child:after { content: "."; }
  </style>
 </head>
 <body>
  <ul>
   <li>One</li>
   <li>Two</li>
   <li>Three</li>
  </ul>
 </body>
</html>
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8  
@Derek, please select your or my answer as THE answer (by clicking left of the answer rating number). This makes it easier for other users with the same problem to find a solution. –  Zyphrax Feb 28 '10 at 16:54
2  
Live example at jsfiddle.net/g3bz3 –  mskfisher Jun 20 '11 at 12:13
1  
A similar problem is the case where you are separating menu items with pipe characters. The same solution works. But, the final content attribute needs to be set to {content:none;} in order to eliminate the final pipe character. –  aridlehoover Aug 19 '11 at 11:07
1  
Order is important too. li:last-child:after works but li:after:last-child does not. –  Richard Ayotte Oct 19 '11 at 14:48
1  
Have in mind that :last-child doesn't belong to CSS3 spec, so it's not supported by IE8 and previous versions. –  Cthulhu Jul 17 '12 at 10:50
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I do like this for list item in <menu> elements. Consider the following markup:

<menu>
  <li><a href="/member/profile">Profile</a></li>
  <li><a href="/member/options">Options</a></li>
  <li><a href="/member/logout">Logout</a></li>
</menu>

I style it with the following CSS:

menu > li {
  display: inline;
}

menu > li:after {
  content: ' | ';
}

menu > li:last-child:after {
  content: '';
}

This will display:

Profile | Options | Logout

And this is possible because of what Martin Atkins explained on his comment

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You can combine pseudo-elements! Sorry guys, I figured this one out myself shortly after posting the question. Maybe it's less commonly used because of compatibility issues.

li:last-child:before { content: "and "; }

li:last-child:after { content: "."; }

This works swimmingly. CSS is kind of amazing.

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1  
So amazing that you can even use it for stuff it's not even intended for... –  Guffa Feb 28 '10 at 16:55
5  
This is a bit of a "nit-picker's corner", but "last-child" is actually a pseudo-class, while "before" and "after" are pseudo-elements. The difference is that a pseudo-class is an additional constraint on an existing element, while a pseudo-element is effectively an entirely new element in the presentation tree that was generated in CSS rather than in HTML. You can combine these for this reason: the last-child is a modifier on the li, and then after you've selected all li elements that are last children you then select (and implicitly create) a new element before and after each. –  Martin Atkins Nov 15 '11 at 14:52
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I am using the same technique in a media query which effectively turns a bullet list into an inline list on smaller devices as they save space.

So the change from:

  • List item 1
  • List item 2
  • List item 3

to:

List Item 1; List Item 2; List Item 3.

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He is trying to do this with CSS. Your method is hard coded HTML. This method is normally used to display Navigation. –  Sparatan117 Apr 9 at 19:25
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Just To mention, in CSS 3

:after

should be used like this

::after

From https://developer.mozilla.org/de/docs/Web/CSS/::after :

The ::after notation was introduced in CSS 3 in order to establish a discrimination between pseudo-classes and pseudo-elements. Browsers also accept the notation :after introduced in CSS 2.

So it should be:

li { display: inline; list-style-type: none; }
li::after { content: ", "; }
li:last-child::before { content: "and "; }
li:last-child::after { content: "."; }
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Adding another answer to this question because I needed precisely what @derek was asking for and I'd already gotten a bit further before seeing the answers here. Specifically, I needed CSS that could also account for the case with exactly two list items, where the comma is NOT desired. As an example, some authorship bylines I wanted to produce would look like the following:

One author: By Adam Smith.

Two authors: By Adam Smith and Jane Doe.

Three authors: By Adam Smith, Jane Doe, and Frank Underwood.

The solutions already given here work for one author and for 3 or more authors, but neglect to account for the two author case—where the "Oxford Comma" style (also known as "Harvard Comma" style in some parts) doesn't apply - ie, there should be no comma before the conjunction.

After an afternoon of tinkering, I had come up with the following:

<html>
 <head>
  <style type="text/css">
    .byline-list {
      list-style: none;
      padding: 0;
      margin: 0;
    }
    .byline-list > li {
      display: inline;
      padding: 0;
      margin: 0;
    }
    .byline-list > li::before {
      content: ", ";
    }
    .byline-list > li:last-child::before {
      content: ", and ";
    }
    .byline-list > li:first-child + li:last-child::before {
      content: " and ";
    }
    .byline-list > li:first-child::before {
      content: "By ";
    }
    .byline-list > li:last-child::after {
      content: ".";
    }
  </style>
 </head>
 <body>
  <ul class="byline-list">
   <li>Adam Smith</li>
  </ul>
  <ul class="byline-list">
   <li>Adam Smith</li><li>Jane Doe</li>
  </ul>
  <ul class="byline-list">
   <li>Adam Smith</li><li>Jane Doe</li><li>Frank Underwood</li>
  </ul>
 </body>
</html>

It displays the bylines as I've got them above.

In the end, I also had to get rid of any whitespace between li elements, in order to get around an annoyance: the inline-block property would otherwise leave a space before each comma. There's probably an alternative decent hack for it but that isn't the subject of this question so I'll leave that for someone else to answer.

Fiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/5REP2/

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