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I've got the following scenario: I'm validating appointments and there's a custom validator, which tells the user if his choosen date is valid or not. It's not valid, if the date is already blocked by another entity. This works flawlessly on adding new entities.

Now I'd like to trigger the date validation on edit only if the date itself has changed. So just changing the title of the appointment should not validate the date.

My entity class:

use Doctrine\ORM\Mapping as ORM;
use Acme\Bundle\Validator\Constraints as AcmeAssert;

/**
 * Appointment
 *
 * @ORM\Entity
 * @AcmeAssert\DateIsValid
 */
class Appointment
{
  /**
   * @ORM\Column(name="title", type="string", length=255)
   *
   * @var string
   */
  protected $title;

  /**
   * @ORM\Column(name="date", type="date")
   *
   * @var \DateTime
   */
  protected $date;
}

The validator class (used as a service):

use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraint;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\ConstraintValidator;
/**
 * Validates the date of an appointment.
 */
class DateIsValidValidator extends ConstraintValidator
{
    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function validate($appointment, Constraint $constraint)
    {
        if (null === $date = $appointment->getDate()) {
            return;
        }

        /* Do some magic to validate date */
        if (!$valid) {
            $this->context->addViolationAt('date', $constraint->message);
        }
    }
}

The corresponding Constraint class is set to target the entity class.

use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraint;

/**
 * @Annotation
 */
class DateIsValid extends Constraint
{
    public $message = 'The date is not valid!';

    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function getTargets()
    {
        return self::CLASS_CONSTRAINT;
    }

    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function validatedBy()
    {
        return 'acme.validator.appointment.date';
    }
}

Now I don't find a clean way to depend on a date change. I could simply track the old date in my entity, but that doesn't feel like a proper solution, if I'd like to implement more complex constraints. :[

Cheers

share|improve this question
    
for know if a field have changed you should use the UnitOfWork. I don't know if it possible to use it in a validation context. –  pietro May 7 '14 at 12:22
    
There are several topics on (mis)using the UOW this way and I tend to don't touch it. –  althaus May 8 '14 at 8:06

3 Answers 3

maybe you want to try it with a preUpdate-Listener instead of a custom validation constraint?

Section 10.5.4 in the doctrine documentation gives an example of a validation listener "ValidCreditCardListener".

i know this will not work for automagic form validation, but i think it's the fastest way atm.

edit: another option could be to use @UniqueEntiy constraint for the date field of your Appointment class. this will not break form validation but will cause an additional database query (as far as i know)

share|improve this answer
    
The the preUpdate-Listener maybe handy is some cases, but my concern is the part "throw an exception to interrupt flush event". So this would be taken out of the regular validation process and you'd be required to take extra care of that. The UniqueEntity won't work as I stripped some more complex logic than "only one appointment per day" from the ACME code. –  althaus May 8 '14 at 7:57

Maybe you will find this article useful, to check which property is changed. Everything is possible in symfony. You might end up writing entity listeners, listener resolvers and so on. Things can get ultra advanced.

http://docs.doctrine-project.org/en/latest/reference/change-tracking-policies.html

Pay attention to the setter method:

public function setData($data)
{
    if ($data != $this->data) {
        $this->_onPropertyChanged('data', $this->data, $data);
        $this->data = $data;
    }
}

Do you see the trick?:)

I would also use !== operator to also check variable type.

You can also simplify things. You dont need to call _onPropertyChanged, but call the function, which will set a property 'dateChanged' to true. Then use method:

public function getGroupSequence()
{
    if($this->dateChanged)
    {
        return ['date_check'];
    }
    else
    {
        return false;
    }
}

And also tell your class that it implements GroupSequenceProviderInterface.

You can then use the validation group in your validation.yml for example.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I stumbled upon the ChangeTrackingPolicy, but I'm still not convinced that adding internal listeners and hacking the tracking in each setter is a desirable approach. Thanks for the heads up on the GroupSequenceProviderInterface. Didn't know about that and this could become quite handy. –  althaus May 8 '14 at 8:03

Since symfony 2.3 you can use Form Events to solve this problem. I added the change-check code to my FormType, by storing (and cloning) the original entity at the form creation.

Then added a POST_SUBMIT event listener to check if the fields were changed. The listener can add validation errors to your fields.

use Symfony\Component\Form\FormEvent;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormEvents;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormError;
use Acme\Bundle\Entity\Appointment;

class AppointmentType extends AbstractType
{
    private $originalAppointment;

    public function __construct(Appointment $original)
    {
        // save the original entity 
        $this->originalAppointment = clone $original;
    }

    // ...

    public function buildForm(FormBuilderInterface $builder, array $options)
    {
        // define your fields

        $builder->addEventListener(FormEvents::POST_SUBMIT, [$this, 'dateCheckListener']);
    }

    public function dateCheckListener(FormEvent $event)
    {
        $appointment = $event->getData();
        $form        = $event->getForm();

        // if no appointments exist, we can skip the check
        if (empty($appointment) || empty($this->originalAppointment)) {
            return;
        }

        if ($appointment->getDate() !== $this->originalAppointment->getDate()) {

            // the dates changed, you can call your validator here

            if ('dates are not valid') {
                $form->get('date')->addError(new FormError('We have a problem.'));
            }
        }
    }
}

In your controller, you can create this formType with the original appointment:

$appointment = $this->getYourAppointmentSomehow();

$form = $this->createForm(new AppointmentType($appointment), $appointment);
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