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I'm looking for a way to make the div that contains my main page content to expand to fit the space left after adding my header and footer. The HTML is laid out like so:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="header-wrapper">
        <header>
            <div id="logo-bar"></div>
        </header>
        <nav></nav>
    </div>
    <div id="content"></div>
</div>


<div id="footer-wrapper">
    <footer></footer>
</div>

It's designed so that the footer is always past the bottom of the page by setting the min-height of #wrapper to 100%. The problem is that #content doesn't expand to fill the empty space inside the #wrapper, making it difficult to get the look I want. How can I make it do that?

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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

For a clean & simple solution that works well in all common browser, use this:

http://ryanfait.com/sticky-footer/

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This looks to be exactly what I need! Thanks! –  vilhalmer Mar 1 '10 at 12:23
1  
This assumes you know the size of the display area up front. –  sproketboy Feb 8 '13 at 14:10
    
@sproketboy: It does not. This works with any vertcal size. All that's needed to know is the footer height. –  Tom Feb 8 '13 at 21:50
2  
Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, we would like you to include the essential parts of the linked article in your answer, and provide the link for reference. Failing to do that leaves the answer at risk from link rot. –  Kev Apr 19 '13 at 2:21
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EDIT:
Why not use top and bottom. Here's a full example.
You can tweak the top and bottom values, to optimize your header/footer placement.

<html>
 <head>
  <style type="text/css">
   BODY {
     margin: 0;
     padding: 0;
   }

   #wrapper {
     position: relative;
     height: 100%;
     width: 100%;
   }

   #header-wrapper {
     position: absolute;
     background-color: #787878;
     height: 80px;
     width: 100%;
   }

   #content {
     position: absolute;
     background-color: #ababab;
     width: 100%;
     top: 80px;
     bottom: 50px;
   }

   #footer-wrapper {
     position: absolute;
     background-color: #dedede;
     height: 50px;
     width: 100%;
     bottom: 0;
   }
  </style>
 </head>
 <body>
  <div id="wrapper">
    <div id="header-wrapper">
      <div id="header">
        <div id="logo-bar">Logo</div>
      </div>
      <div id="nav"></div>
    </div>
    <div id="content">Content</div>
    <div id="footer-wrapper">
      <div id="footer">Footer</div>
    </div>
  </div>
 </body>
</html>
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Using both top and bottom properties on a div causes problems in IE6 and IE7/8 in quirks mode. Don't know if the OP wants to support those. –  Marcel Korpel Feb 28 '10 at 17:04
    
The use of top/bottom is a good idea, I always forget about those. Thanks for the detailed answer! –  vilhalmer Mar 1 '10 at 12:24
    
Is this top/bottom technique possible with a fixed width centered 960 content div? –  user1114176 Dec 24 '11 at 1:05
    
@Jordan, sure just make sure that the surrounding div is relative and the inner divs are absolute. –  Zyphrax Dec 24 '11 at 5:46
    
This does NOT work if content scrolls. –  sproketboy Feb 8 '13 at 14:09
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A good article for footers is at A List Apart: http://www.alistapart.com/articles/footers/

It has the actual example of how you position a footer at the bottom with the expanding content div.

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Great article, thanks for passing it along. –  vilhalmer Mar 1 '10 at 12:24
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