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If I have three classes

class A

class B extends A

class C extends A

Would using abstract classes or interfaces give me any type of errors or affect the way I implement the program?

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8  
It depends. What are you trying to do? – SLaks Feb 28 '10 at 18:29
8  
The way you're asking this is so vague that I would almost consider it not to be a real question. Read up on subclassing, interfaces, and abstract classes, and try to ask something more specific. – MatrixFrog Feb 28 '10 at 18:31
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Unless you need to share implementation, favor interfaces.

If you need to share implementation, think carefully if an abstract class is the right way to accomplish this.

Inheritance is a powerful tool, but can easily create an unmaintainable mess (I have been guilty here).

But to answer your question - no, there is nothing inherent in this setup that would cause an "error".

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You should generally prefer interfaces whenever you can. Java's lack of multiple inheritance quickly becomes a limiting factor if you use classes for that.

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Java allows multiple inheritance for interfaces and if you use AspectJ you can add implementations of methods directly to interfaces. Put both together and you get: Multiple implementation inheritance. – whiskeysierra Feb 28 '10 at 23:37

Yes. Abstract classes trade a shorter way of reusing implementation for the flexibility to provide multiple interfaces to the same object.

Unless you're playing code-golf, choosing the flexibility of interfaces is usually the better option.

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