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I've created a linked list in java using generics, and now I want to be able to iterate over all the elements in the list. In C# I would use yield return inside the linked list while going over the list of elements contained in the list.

How would I go about creating a java version of the above where I can iterate over all the items contained in the linked list?

I'm looking to be able to write code ala

LinkedList<something> authors = new LinkedList<something>();
for (Iterator<something> i = authors.Values ; i.HasNext())
      doSomethingWith(i.Value);

And was thinking that the Value 'property'/method would consist of code resembling

LinkedListObject<something> current = first;
While (current != null){
 yield return current.getValue();
 current = current.getNext()
}

Edit: Notice that I'm not interested in using any 3rd party APIs. Built-in java functionality only.

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i dont know C#. Curious, what does yield return do? –  bragboy Feb 28 '10 at 19:59
    
    
Thanks read it. That seems too much compiler (programming language) centric to me. In java, its tough but achievable. –  bragboy Feb 28 '10 at 20:09
7  
too much compiler centric? If I imagine I'd have to program myself all the things that compiler programs for me... –  flq Feb 28 '10 at 20:40
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10 Answers 10

up vote -2 down vote accepted

Am I missing something here? There is already java.util.LinkedList, it is fully generics-enabled, and it has a method which returns an Iterator.

If you really want to re-invent the wheel, I'd suggest you look into to creating a LinkedListIterator class, probably implementing ListIterator. It would remember its current position within the linked list and advance it on each successive call.

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1  
The reasons for creating my own data structures are due to extensive need for performance enchancement later on in the process (might not apply as much to the linked list as to the hash table). Your solution with a sub-classed iterator was that one I eventually used to solve the problem at hand. –  Kasper Holdum Mar 1 '10 at 18:04
4  
I think you may be missing something (as is the OP). yield return in C#/.Net creates only an iterator. If the consumer of the iterator terminates early, then so does the loop that generates the iteration. An infinite generator is an example of something that isn't possible without an iterator that doesn't use a collection as an intermediate step. For the example they gave, you would of course just return the iterator from LinkedList. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 19 '12 at 18:45
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try this

check this article for a sample implementation as well:

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You can return an anonymous implementation of Iterable. The effects are pretty pretty similar, just that this is a lot more verbose.

public Iterable<String> getStuff() {
    return new Iterable<String>() {

        @Override
        public Iterator<String> iterator() {
            return new Iterator<String>() {

                @Override
                public boolean hasNext() {
                    // TODO code to check next
                }

                @Override
                public String next() {
                    // TODO code to go to next
                }

                @Override
                public void remove() {
                    // TODO code to remove item or throw exception
                }

            };
        }
    };
}
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"yield return" is a very sophisticated compiler trick. It basically lets you declaratively implement IEnumerable without any of the annoying details of "figuring out" how to build your iterator. The unfortunate thing is that it does not translate into other languages well because very few compilers have such a capability. In some ways "yield return" is as damning as revolutionary.

Basically in C#, the compiler will generate two implementations of IEnumerable and IEnumerator (of T). It does this by basically realizing your "method"'s local variables as instance fields in generated implementation classes as well as examining the frames containing a "yield return" artifact. Once you know this, it should be possible for a well rounded developer to accomplish the same thing explicitly... although not as concisely. To demonstrate, I will CONCAT!

public static <T> Iterable<T> concat(Iterable<T> x, Iterable<T> y)
{
    for(T e: x)
    {
        yield return e;
    }

    for(T e: y)
    {
        yield return e;
    }
}

// becomes ....

public static <E> Iterator<E> concat_(Iterable<E> x, Iterator<E> y)
{
    T e1, e2;
    Iterator<E> i1, i2;

    Iterator<E> s;
    Iterator<E> s4 = new Iterator<E>()
    {
        public bool hasNext()
        {
            return false;
        }

        public E next()
        {
            throw ... ;
        }

        public void remove()
        {
            throw ... ;
        }
    }

    Iterator<E> s3 = new Iterator<E>()
    {
        Iterator<E> act()
        {
            if(i2.hasNext())
            {
                return i2;
            }

            i2 = y.iterator();
            return (s = s4);
        }

        public bool hasNext()
        {
            return act().hasNext();
        }

        public E next()
        {
            return act().next();
        }

        public void remove()
        {
            return i2.remove();
        }
    }

    Iterator<E> s2 = new Iterator<E>()
    {
        Iterator<E> act()
        {
            if(i1.hasNext())
            {
                return i1;
            }

            i2 = y.iterator();
            return (s = s3);
        }

        public bool hasNext()
        {
            return act().hasNext();
        }

        public E next()
        {
            return act().next();
        }

        public void remove()
        {
            return i1.remove();
        }
    };

    Iterator<E> s1 = new Iterator<E>()
    {
        Iterator<E> act()
        {
            i1 = x.iterator();
            return s = s2;
        }

        public bool hasNext()
        {
            return act().hasNext();
        }

        public E next()
        {
            return act().next();
        }

        public void remove()
        {
            return act().remove();
        }
    };

    s = s1;
    return new Iterator<T>()
    {
        public bool hasNext()
        {
            return s.hasNext();
        }

        public E next()
        {
            return s.next();
        }

        public void remove()
        {
            return s.remove();
        }
    };
}

public static <T> Iterable<T> concat(Iterable<T> x, Iterable<T> y)
{
    return new Iterable<T>()
    {
        public Iterator<T> iterator()
        {
            return concat_(x, y)
        }
    };
}

// tada!

If you all will pardon my 3AM pseudo java...

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I don't understand why people are talking about threads... is there something I don't know about yield return?

To my understanding yield return just saves the method stack and restores it at a later time. To implement yield return you just have to save the state manually. See the Java iterator classes for details, though for a linked list you can just get away with saving the current item. For an array you'd just need the index.

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This is correct. Yield and yield return don't use threads in C#. They do a compile time transformation and create a state machine, but that state machine doesn't use any extra threads (although it's possibly thread safe). –  Sean Reilly Feb 22 '12 at 12:08
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I have tried to understand what yield does but without the C# experience i am not sure if i have it but i will try anyway...

I would suggest the following...

Something answer = null;
for (Something author: authors){

  if (author.equals("Tom Jones"){
    answer = author;
    break;
  }
}

When it comes to returning the values from a method i would do the following...

    public LinkedList<something> getAuthors(LinkedList<something> list){
      LinkedList<something> ret = new LinkedList<something>();
      for (something s:list){
        if (s.equals("abc"))
          ret.add(s);
      }
      return ret;
    }

Have i lost the plot?

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where are you calling getAuthors(LinkedList)? –  bragboy Feb 28 '10 at 20:42
    
ummm... you would call getAuthors from anywhere in your code. if you create a class called Utils (as an example) and made the method static you could then say Utils.getAuthors(pass your list here); and that will return your new list. –  Paul Feb 28 '10 at 20:57
2  
I'm late but what you need to understand is that in C#, the yield return statement will only be executed once the "MoveNext()" method of the IEnumerable is called. The items in the IEnumerable are lazily evaluated as opposed to your example. –  GuiSim Jan 19 '12 at 15:53
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If you want the full functionality of yield return, you probably need to set this up in two threads-- one for the first method, and one for the second. Then the first thread should wait until the second thread puts its value somewhere accessible and notifys it that it's ready. Then the first thread would process that value, wait for the next value, etc.

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Just to help readers understand the small details.

If you create a new list containing all the resulting elements and return the list, then this is a good implementation, simple enough to code. You can have as interesting data structure as you need, and when scanning it for the right entries, just return a list of all the matches, and your client will iterate on the list.

If you want to save a state, it may be more complicated. You'll need to get to where you've been every time your function is called. Not to mention re-entrant issues, etc.

The solution with threads does not create a new list. And it is as simple as the first solution. The only issue is that you involve a thread synchronization which is a bit more hard to code, and has its performance penalties.

So, yes, yield return is great and is missing from Java. Yet there are workarounds.

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I guess you should consider using threads to do a similar implementation in Java. I read what yield return does and to my understanding it seems to be a very dynamic. You should be able to achieve the similar functionality, but you will have to come up with your own set of class. Asad here has given few links.

But one thing I can tell is you cannot make java understand these things by itself within a for loop. You need to explicitly instruct them. Thats there for sure.

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use my java library to realize yield return without using threads or byte code manipulation

http://www.heinerkuecker.de/YieldReturnForNested.html

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