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I am writing a vector class and I would like it to have the following characteristics:

  1. Use static allocation on the stack whenever possible (to avoid calling new for efficiency).
  2. Be able to be instantiated from a pointer if the user prefers to provide a previously allocated array.
  3. The class needs to be easily converted to a simple pointer. This allows to use previously written routines in C.

Find below this simple test problem with the solution I came up with. I use inheritance so Vector inherits from Vector_base which provides a common interface (pure virtual) for all vectors. Then I define an empty class Vector that allows me then using partial specialization to have different storage schemes; static or dynamic.

The idea behind this is that I just want vector to be a C++ wrapper to the old-fashioned static array.

I like the implementation below. I'd like to keep the interface I came up with in main.

What I don't like is that sizeof(Vector3) = 32 when in C a vector of three doubles is 24 bytes. The reason for this is the extra 8 bytes of the virtual table.

My question: can I somehow come up with another design that would provide me with the same interface but the vector only has 24 bytes?

Summarizing:

  1. I'd like have a Vector3 of 24 bytes, as in C.
  2. I still want to have arbitrarily large vectors though (with <double,n>)
  3. I'd like to keep the interface used in main().

Could I use a programming idiom like traits or polices for this? I am very new to those and I don't know if they could provide a solution.

Find my little test code below:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#define TRACE0(a) cout << #a << endl; a;
#define TRACE1(a) cout << #a "=[" << a << "]" << endl;

enum alloc_type {Static,Dynamic};

template <class T>
class Vector_base{
public:
  Vector_base(){}
  virtual operator T*() = 0;
  virtual T operator[](int i)const = 0;
  virtual T& operator[](int i) = 0;
  virtual int size() const = 0;
  friend ostream& operator<<(ostream &os,const Vector_base& v){
    for (int i=0; i<v.size(); i++)
      cout << v[i] << endl;
    return os;
  }
};

// base template must be defined first
template <class T, int n,alloc_type flg=Static>
class Vector{};

//Specialization for static memory allocation.
template <class T, int n>
class Vector<T,n,Static>: public Vector_base<T>{
public:
  T a[n];
public:
  Vector() { 
    for (int i=0; i<n; i++) a[i] = 0; 
  }
  int size()const{return n;}
  operator T*(){return a;}
  T operator[](int i)const {return a[i];}
  T& operator[](int i){return a[i];}
};

//Specialization for dynamic memory allocation
template <class T,int n>
class Vector<T,n,Dynamic>: public Vector_base<T>{   //change for enum. flg=0 for static. flg=1 for dynamic. Static by default
public:
  T* a;
public:  
  Vector():a(NULL){
  }  
  Vector(T* data){ //uses data as its storage
    a = data;
  }
  int size()const{return n;}
  operator T*(){return a;}
  T operator[](int i)const {return a[i];}
  T& operator[](int i){return a[i];}
};

//C++11 typedefs to create more specialized three-dimensional vectors.
#if (__cplusplus>=201103L)
template <typename Scalar,alloc_type flg=Static>
using Vector3 = Vector<Scalar,3,flg>;
#else
#error A compiler with the C++2011 standard is required!
#endif

int main(){

  cout << "Testing Vector3: " << endl;

  //Vector<double,3> v3;
  Vector3<double> v3;
  TRACE0(cout << v3 << endl;);
  TRACE1(sizeof(v3));

  //Vector<double,3,Dynamic> v0(v3);
  Vector3<double,Dynamic> v0(v3); //calls Vector<double,3,Dynamic>::Vector(double*) and uses the conversion operator on v3.
  TRACE1(sizeof(v0));
  TRACE1(sizeof(double*));

  TRACE0(v3[1] = 2.1;);
  TRACE0(cout << v0 << endl;);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What's wrong with std::vector? –  Jefffrey May 7 at 19:17
    
@Jefffrey, This is targeted to a very efficient implementation for numerical computations. The idea is then to call very specialized C routines to perform dot/cross products, norms, matrix-vector multiply, etc. std::vector was not designed for that end. –  Alejandro May 7 at 19:19
2  
@BenVoigt use std::array? v0v –  Jefffrey May 7 at 19:24
3  
@BenVoigt, then use std::vector. Can you see a pattern? –  Jefffrey May 7 at 19:26
1  
@DeadMG: The OP's interface is polymorphic, so you have algorithms that work on either type of vector seamlessly. –  Ben Voigt May 7 at 19:51

5 Answers 5

All the features you want are offered as Standard or can be plugged in to existing Standard extension points.

Use static allocation on the stack whenever possible (to avoid calling new for efficiency).

Meet std::array<T, N>. It's a C++ wrapper on a C array and presents all the same characteristics.

Be able to be instantiated from a pointer if the user prefers to provide a previously allocated array.

Meet Allocators. You can code an allocator that meets the requirement that gives back already allocated memory, then simply use std::vector. Such an allocator is under consideration for future Standards along with other allocator enhancements like polymorphic allocators.

The class needs to be easily converted to a simple pointer. This allows to use previously written routines in C.

Both std::vector and std::array offer this as a triviality.

If you want to offer this choice at runtime, consider boost::variant. Rolling your own discriminated union- not advised.

share|improve this answer
    
Reminder: std::array is only available in C++11 and beyond. Many shops are still using older versions. –  Thomas Matthews May 7 at 19:32
    
@ThomasMatthews: std::array is absolutely trivial to write in C++03 and also available in Boost. –  Xeo May 7 at 19:33
4  
Try reading the OP's post. He already contains a static assertion for C++11 and dependence on C++11 features. –  Puppy May 7 at 19:33
    
I looked into these options before. Could you please look at the interface in main? do you think you can provide an implementation in terms of the STL that would satisfy my requirements with that interface?. That's all I'm asking @jeffrey, please leave personal preferences aside. –  Alejandro May 7 at 19:35
3  
@ThomasMatthews the C++11 tag is pretty hard to miss... –  TemplateRex May 7 at 19:44

If I understand you correctly, something like LLVM's SmallVector seems to fit the bill. It has a template parameter declaring the maximum size you want allocated on the stack, and switches to heap memory only when it grows outside that range.

If it doesn't fit your interface directly, I'm sure looking at the implementation will be very useful towards writing something similar yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks very interesting. Thank you. I will look into it. –  Alejandro May 8 at 13:11

You are talking about two policies for locating the data: either inline as a small-array optimization, or via indirection with a pointer to a dynamically allocated buffer.

There are two ways to make that policy choice: With static type information, or dynamically. The dynamic choice requires storage to indicate whether any particular vector uses the static or dynamic policy.

For a vector of doubles, you can perhaps use an illegal value in the first element (a NaN encoding) to indicate that the dynamic policy is in effect (the pointer needs to be stored overlapping the remaining elements, use a union for this).

But in other data types, all possible bit patterns are valid. For those you will require additional storage to select the policy. You might know for a particular problem that a particular bit isn't needed for the range of values, and can be used as a flag. But there's no general solution applicable to all data types.

You probably want to look at implementations of the "small string optimization". They are making the same tradeoff for improved locality of reference when the data is small enough to store directly inside the object, and also generally trying to avoid using mode space than necessary.

One thing is for sure. In order to avoid significantly increase in space requirements, you're going to need close coupling. No specialization, no inheritance, just one monolithic class that implements both policies.

share|improve this answer

Ok guys. It took me all day but this is the solution I came up with and it does exactly what I want. Please share your comments and suggestions to this solution. Of course I didn't implement all methods I want. I only implemented two fake dot products to show how specific C implementations are chosen at compile time by use of templates.

The scheme is quite more complex than what I thought it would be. The basic concepts I'm using to accomplish my design requirements are:

  1. the curiously recurring template pattern.
  2. Partial specialization
  3. Traits
  4. Compile-time selection with templates (see how I decide what dot product implementation to use).

Again, thanks and please comment!! See code below

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
#include <type_traits>

//C++11 typedefs to create more specialized three-dimensional vectors.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
#if (__cplusplus<201103L)
#error A compiler with the C++2011 standard is required!
#endif

template<class T>
struct traits{};

#define TRACE0(a) cout << #a << endl; a;
#define TRACE1(a) cout << #a "=[" << a << "]" << endl;

enum {Dynamic = -1};

template<typename T,int n>
struct mem_model{
  typedef T array_model[n];
};

//Specialization to Dynamic                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
template<typename T>
struct mem_model<T,Dynamic>{
  typedef T* array_model;
};

template<class derived_vector>
struct Vector_base: public traits<derived_vector>{ //With traits<derived_vector> you can derive the compile time specifications for 'derived_vector'                                                                                                                                                                         
  typedef traits<derived_vector> derived;
  typedef typename traits<derived_vector>::Scalar Scalar;

public:
  inline int size()const{ //Calling derived class size in case a resize is done over a dynamic vector                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
    return static_cast<const derived_vector*>(this)->size(); //derived_vector MUST have a member method size().                                                                                                                                                                                                              
  }

  inline operator Scalar*(){return a;} //All vectors reduce to a Scalar*                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

  inline bool IsStatic()const{return (n==Dynamic)? false: true;}

  inline int SizeAtCompileTime()const{return n;} //-1  for dynamic vectors                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   

protected:
  using derived::n; //compile time size. n = Dynamic if vector is requested to be so by the user.                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
  typename mem_model<Scalar,n>::array_model a;  //All vectors have a Scalar* a. Either static or dynamic.                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
};

//Default static                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
template<typename Scalar,int n>
class Vector:public Vector_base<Vector<Scalar,n> >{ //Vector inherits main interface from Vector_base                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
public:
  //Constructors                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             
  Vector(){
    //do nothing for fast instantiation                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      
  }
  Vector(const Scalar& x,const Scalar& y,const Scalar& z){
    a[0] = x; a[1] = y; a[2] = z;
  }

  //                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
  inline int size()const{return n;}

private:
  using Vector_base<Vector<Scalar,n> >::a;

};

//Traits specialization for Vector. Put in an inner_implementation namespace                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
template<typename _Scalar,int _n>
struct traits<Vector<_Scalar,_n> >{
  typedef _Scalar Scalar;
  enum{
    n = _n
  };
};

double clib_dot_product_d(const int n,double* a,double* b){
  double dot = 0.0;
  for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
    dot += a[i]*b[i];
  return dot;
}
float clib_dot_product_f(const int n,float* a,float* b){
  cout << "clib_dot_product_f" << endl;
  return 1.0;
}

template<typename Scalar>
struct dot_product_selector{};

template<>
struct dot_product_selector<double>{
  template<class derived1,class derived2>
  static double dot_product(Vector_base<derived1> &a,Vector_base<derived2> &b){
    return clib_dot_product_d(a.size(),a,b);
  }
};

template<>
struct dot_product_selector<float>{
  template<class derived1,class derived2>
  static float dot_product(Vector_base<derived1> &a,Vector_base<derived2> &b){
    return clib_dot_product_f(a.size(),a,b);
  }
};

template<class derived1,class derived2>
typename Vector_base<derived1>::Scalar dot_product(Vector_base<derived1> &a,Vector_base<derived2> &b){
  //run time assert checking the two sizes are the same!!                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

  //Compile time (templates) check for the same Scalar type                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  
  static_assert( std::is_same<typename Vector_base<derived1>::Scalar,typename Vector_base<derived2>::Scalar>::value,"dot product requires both vectors to have the same Scalar type");
  return dot_product_selector<typename Vector_base<derived1>::Scalar>::dot_product(a,b);
}

#if 0
template <typename Scalar,alloc_type flg=Static>
using Vector3 = Vector<Scalar,3,flg>;
#endif

int main(){

  cout << "Testing Vector3: " << endl;


  Vector<double,3> as;
  Vector<double,Dynamic> ad;

  TRACE1(sizeof(as));
  TRACE1(sizeof(ad));

  TRACE1(as.SizeAtCompileTime());
  TRACE1(ad.SizeAtCompileTime());

  Vector<double,3> u(1,2,3),v(-1,1,5);
  Vector<float,3> uf,vf;
  TRACE1(dot_product(u,v));

  dot_product(uf,vf);

  //dot_product(u,vf); //this triggers a compile time assertion using static_assert                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

You could simplify the Vector template specialization to...

template <class T, std::size_t Size = -1>
class Vector {
    // The statically allocated implementation
};

template <class T>
class Vector<T, -1> {
    // The dynamically allocated implementation
};

The implementations could possibly be thin wrappers around std::vector and std::array.

EDIT: This avoid the magic constant...

template<typename T = void>
class Structure {};

template<typename T, std::size_t Size>
class Structure<T[Size]> {
    T data[Size];
    // The statically allocated implementation
};

template<typename T>
class Structure<T[]> {
    T * pData;
public:
    Structure(std::size_t size) : pData(new T[size]) {}
    ~Structure() { delete[] pData; }
    // The dynamically allocated implementation
};

Instantiated like this...

Structure<int[]> heap(3);
Structure<int[3]> stack;

EDIT: Or use policies like so...

class AllocationPolicy {
protected:
    static const std::size_t Size = 0;
};
template<std::size_t Size_>
class Static : AllocationPolicy {
protected:
    static const std::size_t Size = Size_;
};
class Dynamic : AllocationPolicy {
protected:
    static const std::size_t Size = 0;
};

template <typename T, typename TAllocationPolicy = Dynamic>
class Vector : TAllocationPolicy {
    static_assert(!std::is_same<typename std::remove_cv<TAllocationPolicy>::type, AllocationPolicy>::value && std::is_base_of<AllocationPolicy, TAllocationPolicy>::value, "TAllocationPolicy must inherit from AllocationPolicy");
    using TAllocationPolicy::Size;
public:
    T data[Size];
};

template <typename T>
class Vector<T, Dynamic> : private Dynamic {
    T * data;
public:
    Vector(std::size_t size) : data(new T[size]) {}
    ~Vector() { delete [] data; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is such a bad idea I cannot even begin to express it in words. –  Jefffrey May 7 at 19:28
    
Having a class which offer a single container interface to two different implementations, one that offers a performance benefit if one knows the size at compile time is an inexplicably bad idea? –  Nick Strupat May 7 at 19:34
    
Or are you wondering if someone would need a Size of the container to be exactly the maximum possible size of an object? Either way, you've caught my interest. –  Nick Strupat May 7 at 19:37
    
He is referring to your choice of -1 as a special magic value. –  Puppy May 7 at 19:38
    
I shouldn't have to spell out that a std::size_t of -1 is guaranteed to be at least as large as the largest possible size of an object. I don't see how that could ever cause a problem. –  Nick Strupat May 7 at 19:39

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