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Recently I discovered a surprising short CG movie about Singular Value Decomposition made in 1976 by Cleve Moler (the inventor of Matlab): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9UoFyqJca8

I started to think how one could obtain similar results with present technology.

By using numpy and matplotlib, it's possible to easily plot a 3D histogram: http://matplotlib.org/examples/mplot3d/hist3d_demo.html

but I would like to ask if someone has suggestions about the possibility to have pyramidal columns (as in the movie), and if there is a way to differently color only some of the columns in the plot (to show particular regions of interest).

I would be interested in indications also if they require other Python libraries, different from matplotlib.

Thanks

share|improve this question

It sounds like you want plot_wireframe:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
import numpy as np

z = np.eye(10)
y, x = np.mgrid[:10, :10]

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111, projection='3d')
ax.plot_wireframe(x, y, z)
plt.show()

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the indication, it seems a promising way. By doubling the resolution of the matrix is possible to obtain a result more similar to that of the movie, where only the central part of each square is different from zero. There remain two questions: 1) I noticed that the wireframe plot produced by matplotlib doesn't delete the hidden lines, so the image is less clear. Is this an intrinsic limitation of the library or there is some workaround? 2) Is there a way to have different color only for some blocks? – Antlab May 8 '14 at 12:28

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