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I am implementing a form of CQRS that uses a single data store but separate Query and Command models. For the command side of things I am implementing DDD including Repositories, IoC and Dependency Injection. For the Query side I am using the Finder pattern as described here. Basically, a finder is similar to a Repository, but with Find methods only.

So in my application for the read side, in my DAL, I use ADO.net and raw SQL to do my queries. The ADO.Net stuff is all abstracted away into a nice helper class so that my Finder classes simply pass the query to the ADO helper which returns generic data objects which the finder/mapper class turns into read models.

Currently the Finder methods, like my command repositories, are accessed through interfaces that are injected into my controllers, but I am wondering if the interfaces, DI and IoC are overkill for the query side, as everything I have read about the read side of CQRS recommends a "thin data layer".

Why not just access my Finders directly? I understand the arguments for interfaces and DI. ie Separation of Concerns and testability. In the case of SOC, my DAL has already separated out database specific logic by using a mapper class and putting the ADO.net stuff in a helper class. As far as testing is concerned, according to this question unit testing read models is not a necessity.

So in summary, for read models, can I just do this:

 public class PersonController : Controller
 {
   public ActionResult Details(int id)
   {

        var person = new Person();
        person = PersonFinder.GetByID(id);

       // TODO: Map person to viewmodel


        return this.View(viewmodel);
    }

 }

Instead of this:

 public class PersonController : Controller
 {

    private IPersonFinder _person;

    public PersonController(IPersonFinder person)
    {
        _person = person;
    }

   public ActionResult Details(int id)
   {
       Person person = _person.GetByID(id);

       // TODO: Map person to viewmodel


        return this.View(viewmodel);
    }

 }
share|improve this question
    
But what if you want to apply some cross-cutting concern to your PersonFinder? That will be very hard to do (and a lot of duplicate code) when you apply it to the static class, while if an interface is injected, you are free to wrap that instance with a decorator, proxy, interceptor, or whatever pattern you have in your toolbox. –  Steven May 8 '14 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Are you using both IoC and DI? That's bad ass! Anyways, the second version is the better one because it doesn't depend on a static class. Using statics will open Pandora's box, don't do it, for all the reasons that using static is bad.

You really don't get any benefits for using a static class and once you are already using a DI Container, there's no additional cost. And you are using the Finders directly but you let the DI Container instantiate one instead of you calling a static object.

Update

A thin read layer refers to using a simplified read model instead of the rich domain objects. It is unrelated to DI, it doesn't matter how the query service is built or by whom, it matters to not involve the business objects in queries.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes you are correct about the static class thing, my mistake. I will edit the question to instantiate the class within the controller method. My concern still remains that by using DI in my read models I am getting away from the concept of a thin data layer for read models. –  Louise Eggleton May 8 '14 at 9:20
    
Your read models are DTOs. You are using DI to keep things decoupled, it's unrelated to the read model. Thin data layer is about having a querying service working directly with a simplified model instead of a rich complex model. Don't overthink this and keep your DI container. –  MikeSW May 8 '14 at 13:09
    
My interpretation of keeping the read layer was to thin was to keep the entire process, of getting data from the DB and displaying it on the screen, thin. Are you suggesting that I should look at this more narrowly and just concentrate on keeping the query aspect and filling my dtos thin? –  Louise Eggleton May 8 '14 at 15:16
    
Even with a DI is still a thin layer, you're using the DI to get the service instance instead of filling manually or the dependencies, that's all. The 'thin' part is about not using domain objects for querying purposes, nothing to do with how you instantiate a query object. Actually there is a query handlers pattern which requires a DI container. –  MikeSW May 8 '14 at 15:48
    
If you add to your answer by summarizing your last few comments I will accept your answer. For future readers purposes I don't want the official answer to be just about the static class thing since I edited that part plus, your comments more fully answer my question. –  Louise Eggleton May 8 '14 at 16:05

Read/Write separation is completely unrelated to coding techniques like dependency injection. Your read models are serving fewer purposes than your combined read/write models were before. Could you consider ditching all the server-side code and just using your database's native REST API? Could you wire your controller to directly query the database with SQL and return the data as JSON? Do you need a generic repository-like pattern to deal with specific read requests?

share|improve this answer
    
My point is that things like dependency injection add architectural overhead. So the separation of read and write is related to coding techniques by the fact that it is recommended that read models be kept thin. –  Louise Eggleton May 8 '14 at 13:57

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