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I'm starting a work on Internet traffic prediction (time series prediction) using artificial neural networks, but I have few experience with the matter.

1 - Does anyone knows which method is the best for that? (time series prediction with what type of neural network)

2 - Deep Learning with unsupervised training is a good idea for time series learning?

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

You can do time-series prediction with neural nets, but it can get pretty tricky.

1) The obvious choice is a recurrent neural network (RNN). However, these can be really difficult to train, and I would not recommend RNNs if this is your first time using neural nets. Recently there has been some interesting work on easing the training of RNNs (e.g. Hessian-free optimization), but again - it's probably not for beginners ;-) Alternatively, you could try a scheme where you use a standard neural net (i.e. not a RNN), and try to predict the next frame of data from the previous? That might work.

2) This question is too general, there is no categorical right answer. Yes, you can use unsupervised feature learning as part of your solution (e.g. pre-training your model), but if your end goal is time-series prediction you will need to do some supervised learning too.

Good luck!

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Thanks for the answer @anderso. I did some experiments and use RNN, MLP and SAE (stacked autoencocers). Both RNN and MLP did well and found good results, and the RNN was a little better. For the deep learning I choose SAE because it was more easy to use and the unsupervised as pre-training, but did not help much, the results were worse than RNN and MLP. I was thinking that maybe BDN and Continuous RBM is a good method to predict time series, I probably will try that. –  Tiago P. O. May 22 '14 at 13:32

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