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I'd like to do some inheritance using Javascript. The problem is I don't know how to keep the A class prototype on the inherited object.

Here is my code :

function Base() {
    this.attribute1 = null;
}

Base.prototype = {
    baseFunction: function() {}
};

function SubBase()
{
    Base.call(this); // Constructor call
    this.baseFunction();
    this.subBaseFunction();
}

SubBase.prototype = Base.prototype;
SubBase.prototype = {
    subBaseFunction: function() {},
    subBaseOtherFunction: function() {}
}

With that way I erase Base.prototype but I don't want to.

I tried SubBase.prototype.__proto__ = Base.prototype; but it is apparently too slow.

I know I can do (but too long to write and not that clean for me) :

SubBase.prototype.subBaseFunction = function() {};
SubBase.prototype.subBaseOtherFunction = function() {};

How can I do it/write it better ?

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You might want to consider doing SubBase.prototype = new Base(); instead of SubBase.prototype = Base.prototype; –  Thomas Eding May 7 '14 at 21:41
    
I think I will use the last way –  thomash May 7 '14 at 21:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, you aren't actually inheriting from Base... you're just adding functions to it.

SubBase.prototype = Base.prototype;
SubBase.prototype.foo = true;
alert(Base.prototype.foo);

To set up the inheritance chain, you need to assign an instance of base as the prototype:

SubBase.prototype = new Base();

Then you augment it, just like you have in your post:

SubBase.prototype.newFunction = function () { };

One weakness of doing inheritance this way is that your base class constructor can't receive arguments. If you need that, then you need to use Object.create to set up the inheritance, and manually call your base class constructor:

function Base(x) {
    alert(x);
};
Base.prototype.baseFunction = function () {
    alert('called method from base class');
};

function SubBase(x) {
    Base.call(this, x);
};
SubBase.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);

var instance = new SubBase(1);
instance.baseFunction();
share|improve this answer
    
By doing new Base(), I also get object's attributes, how can I remove them from the prototype ? –  thomash May 7 '14 at 21:44
    
If you don't want them inherited, don't add them to Base.prototype and don't set them inside of the constructor. Unfortunately, passing arguments to base class constructors is not easy; you have to explicitly call that constructor –  Andrew Vermie May 7 '14 at 21:46
1  
I have edited my answer to show how to pass arguments to the base class constructor. –  Andrew Vermie May 7 '14 at 21:57
    
With SubBase.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype), I'm inheriting from Base ? –  thomash May 7 '14 at 21:59
1  
Yes, you can test with new SubBase(x).baseFunction() - baseFunction is inherited. I added an example to the answer. –  Andrew Vermie May 7 '14 at 22:01

Instead of this:

SubBase.prototype = Base.prototype;
SubBase.prototype = {
    subBaseFunction: function() {},
    subBaseOtherFunction: function() {}
}

you need to add each additional method onto the existing prototype object to avoid overwriting the Base.prototype you just put there:

// establish the prototype we're inheriting from
// make a new object into the prototype so when we change it, it 
// doesn't change the original
SubBase.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);

// now add more methods onto the inherited prototype
SubBase.prototype.subBaseFunction = function() {};
SubBase.prototype.subBaseOtherFunction = function() {};

Note: you also don't want to just assign Base.prototype because then when you change SubBase.prototype, you'll actually be changing both objects (an object assignment is just a reference). So here, I'm using Object.create(Base.prototype) to create a copy of that prototype.


Many libraries support some sort of extend() function that copies properties from one object to another. That lets you define a separate object of methods and then "add" it to the existing prototype, but this functionality isn't built-in to plain javascript.

For example in jQuery, you can do this:

// establish the prototype we're inheriting from
SubBase.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);

jQuery.extend(SubBase.prototype, {
    subBaseFunction: function() {},
    subBaseOtherFunction: function() {}
});

Or, you can make your own function that will copy properties from one object to another in only a few lines of code.


Or, the same code in plain javascript:

// copy properties from src to target
function copyProperties(target, src) {
    for (var prop in src) {
        if (src.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            target[prop] = src[prop];
        }
    }
    return(target);
}

// establish the prototype we're inheriting from
SubBase.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);

copyProperties(SubBase.prototype, {
    subBaseFunction: function() {},
    subBaseOtherFunction: function() {}
});

Here's the style I typically use:

function Base() {
    this.attribute1 = null;
}

Base.prototype = {
    baseFunction: function() {}
};

function SubBase()
{
    Base.apply(this, arguments); // Constructor call with arguments
}

(function() {
    var proto = SubBase.prototype = Object.create(Base.prototype);
    proto.constructor = SubBase;
    proto.subBaseFunction = function() {
        // code here
    };
    proto.subBaseOtherFunction = function() {
        // code here
    };
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Yes I think it's the only way to make it work ! Edit : I won't use jQuery –  thomash May 7 '14 at 21:47
    
@thomash - no problem on jQuery. I was just illustrating an extend() type method that copies properties from one object to another. It only takes about 10 lines of code to write such a function yourself - no need for jQuery to use that style. –  jfriend00 May 7 '14 at 22:02
    
@thomash - look at the style I typically use that I added to the end of my answer. –  jfriend00 May 7 '14 at 22:28

You could use jQuery.extend() for this:

SubBase.prototype = {
    subBaseFunction: function() {},
    subBaseOtherFunction: function() {}
};

$.extend(SubBase.prototype, Base.prototype);

See: http://jsfiddle.net/dd6UC/

jQuery.extend() docs: http://api.jquery.com/jquery.extend/

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