Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm building an application which involves the creation of an array of objects, similar to this:

var foo = [{
'foo' : 'foo1' 
},
{
'foo' : 'foo2' 
},
{
'foo' : 'foo3' 
}];

there's then an HTML form where the user fills in the values for new objects. When the form is submitted the new values are pushed to the array. what I want is an if/else statement which checks if the new object already exists in the array. So something like:

document.getElementById('form').addEventListener('submit',function(){
var newObject = {'foo' : input value goes here }
if (//Checks that newObject doesn't already exist in the array) {
    foo.push(newObject)
}
else {
//do nothing
}
});

It's also probably worth noting that I'm using Angular

share|improve this question
1  
Just use Object instead of Array. – bits May 7 '14 at 22:19
    
    
ECMAScript 6 Gives you the .find() method. if (foo.find(function(obj) { return obj.foo === newObject.foo; }) === undefined) { foo.push(newObject); } – cookie monster May 7 '14 at 22:30
    
is [].find() any better than [].some() in this case? – dandavis May 8 '14 at 2:53

You can use this approach:

You need:

  1. Understand how to compare 2 objects.
  2. Do it in cycle.

How to compare 2 objects.

One of the ways is:

JSON.stringify(obj1) === JSON.stringify(obj2) 

Note, that comparing ojbects this way is not good:

Serializing objects merely to compare is terribly expensive and not guaranteed to be reliable

As cookie monster mentioned in comments to this post. I just suggested it, to achieve what you want. You can find better variant. You can find some beautiful answers here.

How to do it in cycle :D

In your case it will be:

function checkIfObjectExists(array, newObject) {
    var i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < array.length; i++ ) {
        var object = array[i];
        if(JSON.stringify(object) === JSON.stringify(newObject)) 
        {
            return true;
        }   
    }
    return false;
}

Also, I added function, so you can use it in your code.

Now add this to your code:

if (checkIfObjectExists(foo, newObject)) {
    // objects exists, do nothing
}
else {
    foo.push(newObject);
}

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
Serializing objects merely to compare is terribly expensive and not guaranteed to be reliable. Also we don't know if all properties should match or just one. And using for-in on an Array is generally considered a bad practice. And finally you're creating an implicit global variable in your function. – cookie monster May 7 '14 at 22:27
    
I just suggested way to serialize objects and provided link to source, where he can find another ways. +. Didn't know about for-in — why it is so; where I can read about it? I edited my answer; is it correct now? – Sharikov Vladislav May 7 '14 at 22:33
    
It's slower, it gives no absolute guarantees of order and if Array.prototype is extended, it'll hit those properties. So there are just too many strikes against it making it not worthwhile when there are no such issues when using a traditional for loop. But don't forget about var before item. That's where the implicit global is being created. – cookie monster May 7 '14 at 22:36
1  
@cookiemonster, thanks for this explanation. Next time, I will use for (and will edit my answer now). Also, I edited problem with item variable. – Sharikov Vladislav May 7 '14 at 22:39
1  
@cookiemonster also removed for-in cycle and added for cycle + mentioned about serializing objects. Thank you. – Sharikov Vladislav May 7 '14 at 22:43

You'd have to loop through the foo-array and check for any duplicates.

document.getElementById('form').addEventListener('submit',function(){
    var newObject = {'foo' : input value goes here }
    if (!isInArray(foo, newObject, 'foo')) {
        foo.push(newObject)
    }
});
function isInArray(arr, newObj, type) {
    var i, tempObj, result = false;
    for (i = 0; i < arr.length; i += 1) {
        tempObj = arr[i];
         if (tempObj[type] === newObj[type]) {
            result = true;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

It's easier and faster if your array doesn't contain objects. Then you simply can make the if-clause to be:

document.getElementById('form').addEventListener('submit',function(){
    var newString = "foo bar";
    if (foo.indexOf(newString) === -1) {
        foo.push(newString);
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.