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I have a global object, SomeObj (using a revealing module pattern), defined in //url/to/js/file.js SomeObj contains two setter methods: SomeObj.setX() and SomeObj.setY() that internally sets some private variables (X and Y) on SomebObj. There is no way to access private variables X and Y except through these set methods that I've exposed via the revealing module pattern.

I have another method called SomeObj.render() that uses the X and Y variables.

So, here's the scenario. Another developer is going to be invoking SomeObj.render() within a third-party callback function.

function thirdPartyCallbackFunction() {
    $.getScript("//url/to/js/file.js", function() {
         SomeObj.render();
    });
}

This code is in a proprietary CMS. However, in the use case, our users are supposed to have the ability to be able to call SomeObj.setX() and SomeObj.setY() to set the variables that SomeObj.render() needs. However, due to the way the CMS was designed, the user does not have access to modify the content area that function thirdPartyCallbackFunction() resides.

In fact, the content area where SomeObj.setX() and SomeObj.setY() can be called may be positioned before or after function thirdPartyCallbackFunction(). If the content area is before function thirdPartyCallbackFunction(), SomeObj is not defined yet and an error will occur.

Is there a way to call .setX() and .setY() before SomeObj is defined? Or is there another approach I should employ?

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1  
It doesn't matter how the code is laid out physically. All that matters is that you call setX and setY before you call thirdPartyCallbackFunction. –  Barmar May 8 '14 at 2:29
    
Your answer is obvious but not helpful. I'm looking for a suggestion on how to do this given my situation. The end user has complete control over the content areas. I was trying to provide a structure/syntax for the end user that would guarantee that setX and setY would be called before the function regardless of where this content area is. –  Stephen May 8 '14 at 13:33

2 Answers 2

Assuming you have absolutely no way of controlling the CMS output, maybe the following might help.

Set your "X" and "Y" variables within the window object.

window.MyArguments = {};
window.MyArguments.X = 'whatever_is_x';
window.MyArguments.Y = 'whatever_is_y';

Once your callback executes, if "MyArguments" exists, you can update the values and call render.

function render() {
    if(window.MyArguments && window.MyArguments.X && window.MyArguments.Y) {
        SomeObj.setX(window.MyArguments.X);
        SomeObj.setY(window.MyArguments.Y);
        SomeObj.render();
    } else {
      //Set a time-out and call the same function again.
    }
}

And you can call this new "render" function within your callback.

function thirdPartyCallbackFunction() {
    $.getScript("//url/to/js/file.js", function() {
         render();
    });
}

You can also try the opposite, where you check if SomeObj is available before calling methods on it and then set a timeout if it isn't available yet.

There is also an option of "sealing" and "unsealing" the pattern to allow partial updates to the definition of your Module.

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Thanks for this idea. I gave you credit, but I actually created a function declaration and dumped my object properties in there. See my answer. –  Stephen May 8 '14 at 13:57
    
Thanks Stephen. where's your answer? –  Serendipity May 8 '14 at 14:02
    
Hi Serendipity, it should be posted as an answer after yours. Refresh the page. You must have looked at my comment while I was writing out the answer. I wasn't expecting you to respond to my comment so quickly! –  Stephen May 8 '14 at 15:05
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I gave Serendipity the credit for the answer. Based on Serendipity's answer about using global variables, I decided to create a global function declaration instead.

function configureSomeObj() {
  SomeObj.setX();
  SomeObj.setY();
}

Even though SomeObj may not be defined yet when this function is read, this function isn't fully evaluated until it is called.

I adjusted the third-party callback to this:

function thirdPartyCallbackFunction() {
    $.getScript("//url/to/js/file.js", function() {
        configureSomeObj();
        SomeObj.render();
    });
}

Now, configreSomeObj() can be anywhere on the page, before or after thirdPartyCallbackFunction(). This does introduce a global function, but the code inside of it is organized.

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1  
I find this is a better answer BTW. –  Serendipity May 8 '14 at 17:00
    
It's good to hear that my solution is reasonable. I wouldn't have thought of this right away (if at all!) if you didn't provide your answer to kickstart my brain. :) –  Stephen May 8 '14 at 17:03
1  
I think you should really mark this as the right answer. Useful for those who may have a similar problem in the future. –  Serendipity May 9 '14 at 4:18
    
Thank you for the vote of confidence in my answer. I have to wait a few hours before I can mark my own answer. –  Stephen May 9 '14 at 12:37

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