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I've built a simple queue in Go. It uses an internal slice to keep track of its elements. Elements are pushed onto the queue by appending to the slice. I'd like to implement .Pop() by removing the first element in elements.

In many other languages, "popping" the first element of a list is a one-liner, which leads me to believe my implementation below is sloppy and verbose. Is there a better way?

type Queue struct {
    elements []interface{}
}

func (queue *Queue) Push(element interface{}) {
    queue.elements = append(queue.elements, element)
}

func (queue *Queue) Pop() interface{} {
    element := queue.elements[0]
    if len(queue.elements) > 1 {
        queue.elements = queue.elements[1:]
    } else {
        queue.elements = make([]interface{}, 0)
    }
    return element
}

Please note that I wish for the Queue to panic if len(queue.elements) == 0. It's not an oversight that I don't check the bounds.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Did you try these?

Pop from queue

x, a = a[0], a[1:]

Pop from stack

x, a = a[len(a)-1], a[:len(a)-1]

Push

a = append(a, x)

From: https://code.google.com/p/go-wiki/wiki/SliceTricks

share|improve this answer
    
Boy, is my face red. I read that article, and thought I had tried the "pop from queue" example, but I tried again and it worked as I had hoped. Thanks! (And sorry for the silly question.) –  modocache May 8 at 3:23
1  
If efficiency is important, you may want to use a ring-buffer style to avoid excessive re-allocation and garbage collection. Something like github.com/eapache/channels/blob/master/queue.go –  Evan May 8 at 3:29
    
I'm just wondering if after popping from the queue, the first element will be ever garbaged collected. If I keep popping the first element and appending at the end, will I end with a huge array? the unused elements are also copied if append() copies the array to a new one? –  siritinga May 8 at 6:57
1  
The first element will only be garbage collected when enough new elements have been added that the slice is reallocated and the removed elements can be discarded. In my ring-buffer sample code, the elements are explicitly niled when removed in order to permit immediate garbage collection. (The unused elements are not copied if append resizes the array). –  Evan May 8 at 17:56
1  
I think the main problem with this approach is that there is potentially an allocation on every queue insert - playground example –  Nick Craig-Wood May 10 at 12:46

If you want a ring buffer or FIFO structure then using a slice as in @Everton's answer will cause garbage collection problems as the underlying array may grow indefinitely.

The easiest way to do this in go, provided you don't mind having a limited size, is to use a channel which is also safe for concurrent access. This is such a common idiom in go that you wouldn't usually bother wrapping it in a type like the below.

Eg (Playground)

package main

import "fmt"

type Queue struct {
    elements chan interface{}
}

func NewQueue(size int) *Queue {
    return &Queue{
        elements: make(chan interface{}, size),
    }
}

func (queue *Queue) Push(element interface{}) {
    select {
    case queue.elements <- element:
    default:
        panic("Queue full")
    }
}

func (queue *Queue) Pop() interface{} {
    select {
    case e := <-queue.elements:
        return e
    default:
        panic("Queue empty")
    }
    return nil
}

func main() {
    q := NewQueue(128)

    q.Push(1)
    q.Push(2)
    q.Push(3)
    fmt.Printf("Pop %d\n", q.Pop())
    fmt.Printf("Pop %d\n", q.Pop())
    fmt.Printf("Pop %d\n", q.Pop())
    fmt.Printf("Pop %d\n", q.Pop())

}
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I'm still new to Go, so I might take me a while to wrap my head around this, but thanks for the answer! I'll come back to it after I learn more about channels. –  modocache May 8 at 7:34
1  
Channels happen to provide a useful and efficient tool for making ring buffers like this. As originally conceived by C.A.R.Hoare though, channels are intended to be used between processes (goroutines); this pattern is rather different. Be aware that if the channel buffer becomes full, and the only consuming thread (calling Pop) is also trying to call Push, a deadlock can occur. @Everton's approach doesn't have this drawback; the garbage collection problem could be solved a different way. –  Rick-777 May 8 at 17:42
2  
@Rick-777 the deadlock is easily solved with another select in the Push method. –  Nick Craig-Wood May 8 at 19:02
2  
@Rick-777 Have updated the answer to show how to detect queue full. –  Nick Craig-Wood May 9 at 14:56
1  
@modocache I'd say if you are communicating between go routines, just use channels - that is what they are for. You don't need queue empty or full detection - the runtime will pause and unpause the goroutines for you automatically. Otherwise you could use this solution which is type safe but bounded, or you could use the code mentioned by Evan which doesn't have any allocation or garbage collection problems. –  Nick Craig-Wood May 10 at 12:51

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