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I have a class called "CardSet", containing an NSMutableArray* cardSet to hold "cards", which I extend to make "DeckCards". I'd like "CardSet" to have a method called "(void)addCard:(Card*)" (and similarly a method "removeCard"). I'd like "addCard" to some how have access to and set cardSet. Even better I'd like to use the "addCard" method to initialise cardSet. The class file "CardSet.h" reads:

 #import < Cocoa/Cocoa.h >

 #import < Card.h >

@interface CardSet : NSObject {

    NSMutableArray* cardSet;

}

-(id)init;

-(NSMutableArray*)getCardSet;

-(void)setCardSet:(NSMutableArray *)new_cardset;

-(Card*)getCard:(NSInteger) index;

**-(void)addCard:(Card*) new_card;**

-(void)removeCard:(Card*) old_card;

-(void)dealloc;

@property (readwrite, retain, getter=getCardSet, setter=setCardSet) NSMutableArray* cardSet;

@end

and the method file reads:

 #import "CardSet.h"

@implementation CardSet

-(id)init{
    if( self = [super init] ){}   //will add initialisations here later
    return self;
}

-(NSMutableArray*)getCardSet{
    return cardSet;
}

-(void)setCardSet:(NSMutableArray *)new_cardSet{
    cardSet = new_cardSet;
}

-(Card*)getCard:(NSInteger)index{
    return [cardSet objectAtIndex:index];
}

**-(void)addCard:(Card *)new_card{
    [cardSet addObject:new_card];
}**

-(void)removeCard:(Card *)old_card{
    [cardSet removeObject:old_card];
}

-(void)dealloc{
    [cardSet release];
    [super dealloc];
}

@synthesize cardSet;

@end

This compiles just fine. I'd like to initialise a "DeckCards" instance using its "addCard" method 52 times. When I call addCard 52 times in a DeckCards setter method, and ask for the size of its "cardSet", I'm returned 0.

This appears to be a scope or privileges problem? Can the "addCard" method have any setter privileges? Must a setter argument be the same as the return and respective member type?

[I can work around the above by creating an NSMutableArray object "deck_cards_temp" outside of "DeckCard", add 52 cards to this, and pass it to set the member of my "DeckCards" instance via the setter inherited from "CardSet". This is not very satisfactory!]

What do you advise? Many thanks in advance for your help and patience.

share|improve this question
    
You should probably also show the source for DeckCards. – Stefan Arentz Mar 1 '10 at 1:53
    
Note that you create code-blocks by indenting by 4 spaces or clicking on the code button. – Georg Fritzsche Mar 1 '10 at 1:57
1  
You should also rename these accessor methods to be KVC-compliant. See developer.apple.com/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/ModelObjects/… for the full list; two you should change are getCardSet (should just be cardSet) and getCard: (should be objectInCardSetAtIndex:). This will enable automatic KVO notification for those accessors, if anything ever (including someday in the future) observes this cardSet property. – Peter Hosey Mar 1 '10 at 2:04
    
Also, don't return your mutable array to callers. Make a copy (and autorelease it) and return that. Any objects that want to change the array should only be able to do so through the CardSet's property, using its accessors, not by mutating the CardSet's array directly. You don't want other objects mutating the array without the CardSet (plus any observers) knowing about it. – Peter Hosey Mar 1 '10 at 2:09
    
Peter beat me to it, but I’ll also add that naming your property the same as your class is a poor choice. – Abizern Mar 1 '10 at 2:16

You are never actually creating the cardSet object. You should be creating it in your -init method:

-(id)init
{
    if( self = [super init] )
    {
        cardSet = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    }
    return self;
}

Because you never actually create the array, all the calls to -addCard: are being sent to a nil object.

When you pass in an array to -setCardSet:, you are passing in an initialized array so the array is no longer nil and the -addCard: calls work fine.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. This is actually commented on in the script to some extent -- I don't think you need to instantiate the NSMutableArray in init, XCode just tells me the array is unused. I've also remarked that passing an array to the setter works just fine but it's unattractive. – SK9 Mar 1 '10 at 6:49
    
Actually what you're saying is a little different... I'll check it out, you're probably right! – SK9 Mar 1 '10 at 7:30
    
You definitely need to instantiate the array if you want to use it. Until you assign a valid array to the cardSets instance variable, its value is nil and all messages to nil are ignored. Some of the other answers have provided information on improving your implementation, but the lack of initialization is the core of your problem. – Rob Keniger Mar 1 '10 at 22:27
    
Don't assume that -init will only be invoked once. Code defensively. – NSResponder Mar 2 '10 at 3:19

CardSet.h

#import <Cocoa/Cocoa.h>

// For know we just need to know there is a class named "Card" being used but implemented later
@class Card;

@interface CardSet : NSObject {
    NSMutableArray *cardSet;
}

// Here are the methods according to "correct" naming conventions
- (Card *)cardAtIndex:(NSInteger)index;
- (void)addCard:(Card *)card;
- (void)removeCard:(Card *)card;

// This will help us and forget about writing the setter/getter
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableArray *cardSet;

@end

CardSet.m

#import "CardSet.h"
// Now we tell the compiler what "Card" is and what methods etc. it has
#import "Card.h"

@implementation CardSet

@synthesize cardSet;

- (id)init {
    if (self = [super init]) {
        // If we don't create the cardSet, how are we able to work with it!?
        NSMutableArray *anArray = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
        self.cardSet = anArray;
        [anArray release];
    }
    return self;
}

- (Card *)cardAtIndex:(NSInteger)index {
    return [cardSet objectAtIndex:index];
}

- (void)addCard:(Card *)card {
    [cardSet addObject:card];
}

- (void)removeCard:(Card *)card {
    [cardSet removeObject:card];
}

- (void)dealloc {
    [cardSet release];
    [super dealloc];
}

@end

As Abizern already noted: Naming the array the same as your class is a bad thing.

share|improve this answer
    
As noted in my comment to NSResponder's answer, you should not use accessors when setting the value of an instance variable in an initializer method. Just set it directly, as in my answer. – Rob Keniger Mar 1 '10 at 22:29
    
Oh you're right. Thanks for pointing that out. So does this mean the accessors aren't properly set up in the init method? When exactly it is safe to use them? – bddckr Mar 2 '10 at 11:09

I would shorten that init method:

- (id)init {
    if (self = [super init]) {
        // If we don't create the cardSet, how are we able to work with it!?
        self.cardSet = [NSMutableArray array];
    }
    return self;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You generally should avoid the use of accessor methods in initializers. Just set the ivar directly. – Rob Keniger Mar 1 '10 at 22:28

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