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Background:

I have built a form which bulk-edits multiple entities of the same type at the same time. The form works correctly as is, it can save the changes made to the exposed fields.

I initialize the form data with an array of entities fetched from the database. $form->handleRequest($request) is using the same array of entities to identify which entity has changed and use its setters to alter its changed properties.

Unfortunately $form->handleRequest($request) is identifying the correspondence between a the form data and the entities based on the array index of the entities.

This means that if the data would change in the DB in such a way that the sorting would change the $form->handleRequest($request) would try to update the wrong entity object because the sort order wouldn't exactly match.

Correction attempts:

  1. I added the id as a hidden field in the form hoping Symfony2 would use it to initialized the object to be updated...

    ...but Symfony2 tried to use setId($newId) and I didn't have a setter defined for that property. So I added the setter and I made it throw an exception if the $newId !== $this->id -- which it does -- if you switch the rows around, or try to save only one row (via ajax) or if you delete rows from the form (via JS).

  2. I tried to use INDEX BY in the query that fetches the entities hoping the matcher algorithm is matching date>entities by array keys... didn't work either.

Question:

I am obviously going about this the wrong way. I'm not using something the way it was designed to be used.

Symfony2 probably has another workflow for bulk-updating stuff. Perhaps handleRequest should only be used when the form is initialized on an entity by ID. Perhaps I should just not use handleRequest and build my own custom logic for updating what changed.

Code:

Controller:

class AAAAController extends Controller
{
    public function AAAAEditAction(Request $request, $filters)
    {
        $AAAAs = $AAAArepo->findBy($filters);

        $form = $this->createForm(new MultiAAAAType(), array('AAAAs' => $AAAAs))
            ->handleRequest($request);

        foreach ($AAAAs as $AAAA) {
            $em->persist($AAAA);
        }
        $em->flush();
    }
}

Main form (containing one single collection field):

class MultiAAAAType extends AbstractType
{
    public function buildForm(FormBuilderInterface $builder, array $options)
    {
        $builder->add(
            'single_aaaa',
            'collection',
            array(
                'type' => new SingleAAAAType(),
            )
        );
    }
}

Sub-form (containing the particular fields that need to be edited):

class SingleEntityType extends AbstractType
{
    public function buildForm(FormBuilderInterface $builder, array $options)
    {
        // adding actual fields here
    }

    public function setDefaultOptions(OptionsResolverInterface $resolver)
    {
        $resolver->setDefaults(
            array(
                'data_class' => '\...\Entity\AAAA',
            )
        );
    }
}

Also:

I know that $form->submit used to be the norm (as used here) and handleRequest calls submit after doing the matching.

I agree that doing the matching by hand wouldn't be all that bad if I use $em->merge to update the entities. The solution would be a few lines of code (as in the answer I mentioned).

But the question at hand is "Am I doing this wrong? Should I be using the above solution? Wasn't handleRequest designed to handle this case?".

If handleRequest can't handle this case that means it can't handle associations properly either without getting into this very same pickle.

share|improve this question
    
Have you looked into data transformers which will retrieve the entities for you on submit. This way the filters won't need to be consistent with the data in the event the data has changed. –  Flosculus May 8 '14 at 10:49
    
@Flosculus Do you mean @ParamConverter? –  Mihai Stancu May 8 '14 at 10:53
    
Scrap that, I misunderstood your problem. To avoid conflicts I would perform a check to see if the data has changed prior to submitting the form (on the server side), report the conflict to the user if there is one. Otherwise you are stuck trying to dynamically sync the submission with additional conditions the user might not be made aware of. –  Flosculus May 8 '14 at 10:56
    
Dynamically syncing the submission wouldn't be that much of a problem if I use INDEX BY. The Doctrine Results would have the ID in its array key, form will have the ID in its array key -- BAM! synced with a single foreach. –  Mihai Stancu May 8 '14 at 11:00
    
It just looked so cool having a one-liner that updates your data. –  Mihai Stancu May 8 '14 at 11:01

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