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I've been working through potential interview questions and one of them was to write a function in C to detect whether a given string was a palindrome or not.

I've gotten a pretty good start on it:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

bool isPalindrome(char *value);

bool isPalindrome(char *value)
{
    if (value == null)
        return false;

    char *begin = value;
    char *end = begin + strlen(value) - 1;

    while(*begin == *end)
    {
        if ((begin == end) || (begin+1 == end))
            return true;

        begin++;
        end--;
    }

    return false;
}


int main()
{
    printf("Enter a string: \n");
    char text[25];
    scanf("%s", text);

    if (isPalindrome(text))
    {
        printf("That is a palindrome!\n");
    }
    else
    {
        printf("That is not a palindrome!\n");
    }
}

However, I now want to ensure that I ignore spaces and punctuation.

What is the best way, given the code I have written above, to advance the pointers forward or backward should they encounter punctuation/spaces?

share|improve this question
    
Is this a school homework? –  Jojo Sardez Mar 1 '10 at 8:07
3  
@Jojo, apparently you didn't bother to read the question. –  Waldrop Mar 1 '10 at 8:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

change the loop to

while(begin < end) {
  while(ispunct(*begin) || isspace(*begin))
    ++begin;
  while(ispunct(*end) || isspace(*end))
    --end;
  if(*begin != *end)
    return false;
  ++begin;
  --end;
}
return true;
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 but instead of ispunct(x) || isspace(x) I would probably use !isalpha(x). It's slightly different, but it's a bit easier on the eyes in my opinion. –  Chris Lutz Mar 1 '10 at 5:12
3  
This will fail on a string composed entirely of punctuation (among others). You need more checks in those loops, to ensure that end and begin don't pass each other while skipping punctuation. –  caf Mar 1 '10 at 5:37
    
@caf, ispunct(0) is false, so begin will be just fine -- you do need to add an && (end > value) in the if guarding the --end, though. –  Alex Martelli Mar 1 '10 at 6:40
    
@chris, !isalpha would also skip digits, which is not what the OP's specs say -- only whitespace and punctuation are to be skipped. –  Alex Martelli Mar 1 '10 at 6:41
1  
isalnum, then? –  jbcreix Mar 1 '10 at 10:32

Inside the while loop, just skip over any characters you want to ignore:

while(*begin == *end)
{
    while ((begin != end) && (isspace(*begin) || isX(*begin))
        ++begin;

   // and something similar for end

One other comment. Since your function is not modifying the parameter, you should define it as:

bool isPalindrome(const char *value);
share|improve this answer
    
+1: For adding "const " in the signature. On the same principle, "const char * begin" and "const char * end"! –  Arun Mar 1 '10 at 7:02

How about writing another function to remove the space and punctuation chars in a string?

share|improve this answer
2  
Well, I could do that. I guess it just seemed like it made more sense if I consumed them by advancing the pointer. –  Waldrop Mar 1 '10 at 5:07
    
Agree; it's definitely better not to allocate space for a new copied string if you don't need to. –  Brooks Moses Mar 1 '10 at 5:47

Refer this following example to check the whether the string is palindrome

 

main()
{
        char  str[100] ;
        printf ( "enter string:");
        scanf ( "%s" ,str ) ;
        if ( ispalindorm(str) )
        {
                printf ( "%s is palindrome \n" );
        }
        else
        {
                printf ( "%s is not a palindrome \n" ) ;
        }
}
int ispalindorm (  char  str[] )
{
         int  i , j ;
        for (i=0,j=strlen(str)-1;i < strlen(str)-1&& (j>0) ;i++,j-- )
        {
                if ( str[i] != str[j] )
                        return  0 ;
        }
        return 1 ;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@pavun_cool, you didn't read the question. This solution doesn't handle spaces or punctuation at all. –  Waldrop Mar 1 '10 at 8:34

Here's my take on it, tried to be concise. Also, just added check for no input

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int p_drome(char *c) {
    int beg=0, end = strlen(c)-1;
    for (;c[beg]==c[end] && beg<strlen(c)/2;beg++,end--);
    return (beg == strlen(c)/2) ? 1 : 0;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  argv[1]?(p_drome(argv[1])?printf("yes\n"):printf("no\n")):printf("no input\n");
}
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