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I have heard that member function templates can't be virtual. Is this true?

If they can be virtual, what is an example of a scenario in which one would use such a function?

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3  
What language please? –  Brian Rasmussen Mar 1 '10 at 6:27
5  
I am asking in context of C++. –  WannaBeGeek Mar 1 '10 at 6:29
4  
I faced a similar problem, and also learned that it is controversial to be virtual and template at the same time. My solution was to write the template magic that will be common amongst the derived classes and call a pure virtual function that does the specialized part. This is of course related to the nature of my problem, so might not work in every case. –  Tamás Szelei Oct 26 '11 at 12:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Think about it for a while:

Q.1. How could you make a templated virtual function?
Q.2. What's its signature?
Q.3. How many vtable entries do you reserve?
Q.4. How would you distinguish between an override/hide and an overload?

Hope that helps.

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1  
Can you please tell me a scenario where we need such function if this feature would have been supported? –  WannaBeGeek Mar 1 '10 at 6:49
22  
@WannaBeGeek: any situation in which you want runtime polymorphism on the first argument and at the same time generic code on another argument (i.e. Visitor pattern with generic implementations at each level, using dynamic runtime information to select an instance of a class and yet at each level you would want to support unrelated arguments in a similar way...) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 1 '10 at 8:52
24  
-1: This may be a useful comment, but it is not a useful answer. –  Björn Pollex May 3 '13 at 11:30

Templates are all about the compiler generating code at compile-time. Virtual functions are all about the run-time system figuring out which function to call at run-time.

Once the run-time system figured out it would need to call a templatized virtual function, compilation is all done and the compiler cannot generate the appropriate instance anymore. Therefore, you cannot have virtual member function templates.

However, there are a few powerful and interesting techniques stemming from combining polymorphism and templates, notably so-called type erasure.

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15  
+1 for mentioning type erasure. I was about to add a comment, then noticed you already mentioned it xD –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 1 '10 at 11:30
    
Just bumped into this and appreciate mag and your answers. I'm trying not to get my hopes too high, but type erasure could be what I've been looking for. –  Mark Essel Nov 11 '11 at 17:36
    
I'm not seeing a language reason for this, only implementation reasons. vtables are not part of the language -- just the standard way compilers implement the language. –  gerardw Oct 3 '13 at 14:29
2  
@gerardw: I have no idea what made you think of vtables. It most certainly wasn't me, because I didn't even mention them. Oh, and you are certainly invited to come up with an implementation of virtual functions that work with compile-time generics. Until then, I consider your downvote that of an uninformed angry young fool. –  sbi Oct 3 '13 at 16:11

C++ doesn't allow virtual template member functions right now. The most likely reason is the complexity of implementing it. Rajendra gives good reason why it can't be done right now but it could be possible with reasonable changes of the standard. Especially working out how many instantiations of a templated function actually exist and building up the vtable seems difficult if you consider the place of the virtual function call. Standards people just have a lot of other things to do right now and C++1x is a lot of work for the compiler writers as well.

When would you need a templated member function? I once came across such a situation where I tried to refactor a hierarchy with a pure virtual base class. It was a poor style for implementing different strategies. I wanted to change the argument of one of the virtual functions to a numeric type and instead of overloading the member function and override every overload in all sub-classes I tried to use virtual template functions (and had to find out they don't exist.)

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2  
@pmr: A virtual function might be called from code that didn't even exist when the function was compiled. How would the compiler determine which instances of a (theoretical) virtual template member function to generate for code that doesn't even exist? –  sbi Mar 1 '10 at 9:24
    
@sbi: Yes, separate compilation would be a huge problem. I'm no expert on C++ compilers at all so I cannot offer a solution. As with templated functions in general it should be instantiated again in every compilation unit, right? Wouldn't that solve the problem? –  pmr Mar 1 '10 at 9:45
1  
@sbi if you're referring to dynamically loading libraries, that's a general problem with template classes / functions, not just with virtual template methods. –  Oak Jul 17 '11 at 20:14
    
I just experienced the same issue first hand for similar reasons. The more I use other languages, the more difficulties I see in c++. –  Mark Essel Nov 11 '11 at 17:38

Virtual Function Tables

Let's begin with some background on virtual function tables and how they work (source):

[20.3] What's the difference between how virtual and non-virtual member functions are called?

Non-virtual member functions are resolved statically. That is, the member function is selected statically (at compile-time) based on the type of the pointer (or reference) to the object.

In contrast, virtual member functions are resolved dynamically (at run-time). That is, the member function is selected dynamically (at run-time) based on the type of the object, not the type of the pointer/reference to that object. This is called "dynamic binding." Most compilers use some variant of the following technique: if the object has one or more virtual functions, the compiler puts a hidden pointer in the object called a "virtual-pointer" or "v-pointer." This v-pointer points to a global table called the "virtual-table" or "v-table."

The compiler creates a v-table for each class that has at least one virtual function. For example, if class Circle has virtual functions for draw() and move() and resize(), there would be exactly one v-table associated with class Circle, even if there were a gazillion Circle objects, and the v-pointer of each of those Circle objects would point to the Circle v-table. The v-table itself has pointers to each of the virtual functions in the class. For example, the Circle v-table would have three pointers: a pointer to Circle::draw(), a pointer to Circle::move(), and a pointer to Circle::resize().

During a dispatch of a virtual function, the run-time system follows the object's v-pointer to the class's v-table, then follows the appropriate slot in the v-table to the method code.

The space-cost overhead of the above technique is nominal: an extra pointer per object (but only for objects that will need to do dynamic binding), plus an extra pointer per method (but only for virtual methods). The time-cost overhead is also fairly nominal: compared to a normal function call, a virtual function call requires two extra fetches (one to get the value of the v-pointer, a second to get the address of the method). None of this runtime activity happens with non-virtual functions, since the compiler resolves non-virtual functions exclusively at compile-time based on the type of the pointer.


My problem, or how I came here

I'm attempting to use something like this now for a cubefile base class with templated optimized load functions which will be implemented differently for different types of cubes (some stored by pixel, some by image, etc).

Some code:

virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<float> &Cube,long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;
virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<short> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;
virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<unsigned short> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;

What I'd like it to be, but it won't compile due to a virtual templated combo:

template<class T>
    virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<T> &Cube,long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
            long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;

I ended up moving the template declaration to the class level. This solution would have forced programs to know about specific types of data they would read before they read them, which is unacceptable.

Solution

warning, this isn't very pretty but it allowed me to remove repetitive execution code

1) in the base class

virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<float> &Cube,long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
            long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;
virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<short> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
            long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;
virtual void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<unsigned short> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
            long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1) = 0;

2) and in the children classes

void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<float> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1)
{ LoadAnyCube(Cube,LowerLeftRow,LowerLeftColumn,UpperRightRow,UpperRightColumn,LowerBand,UpperBand); }

void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<short> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1)
{ LoadAnyCube(Cube,LowerLeftRow,LowerLeftColumn,UpperRightRow,UpperRightColumn,LowerBand,UpperBand); }

void  LoadCube(UtpBipCube<unsigned short> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1)
{ LoadAnyCube(Cube,LowerLeftRow,LowerLeftColumn,UpperRightRow,UpperRightColumn,LowerBand,UpperBand); }

template<class T>
void  LoadAnyCube(UtpBipCube<T> &Cube, long LowerLeftRow=0,long LowerLeftColumn=0,
        long UpperRightRow=-1,long UpperRightColumn=-1,long LowerBand=0,long UpperBand=-1);

Note that LoadAnyCube is not declared in the base class.


Here's another stack overflow answer with a work around: need a virtual template member workaround.

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the code block after in the base class is hiding the template specialization <float>, <short>, <unsigned short>. not sure why –  Mark Essel May 9 '12 at 21:50
    
got the template specialization to show –  Mark Essel Jul 11 '12 at 21:29

The following code can be compiled and runs properly, using MinGW G++ 3.4.5 on Window 7:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class A{
public:
    virtual void func1(const T& p)
    {
        cout<<"A:"<<p<<endl;
    }
};

template <typename T>
class B
: public A<T>
{
public:
    virtual void func1(const T& p)
    {
        cout<<"A<--B:"<<p<<endl;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    A<string> a;
    B<int> b;
    B<string> c;

    A<string>* p = &a;
    p->func1("A<string> a");
    p = dynamic_cast<A<string>*>(&c);
    p->func1("B<string> c");
    B<int>* q = &b;
    q->func1(3);
}

and the output is:

A:A<string> a
A<--B:B<string> c
A<--B:3

And later I added a new class X:

class X
{
public:
    template <typename T>
    virtual void func2(const T& p)
    {
        cout<<"C:"<<p<<endl;
    }
};

When I tried to use class X in main() like this:

X x;
x.func2<string>("X x");

g++ report the following error:

vtempl.cpp:34: error: invalid use of `virtual' in template declaration of `virtu
al void X::func2(const T&)'

So it is obvious that:

  • virtual member function can be used in a class template. It is easy for compiler to construct vtable
  • It is impossible to define a class template member function as virtual, as you can see, it hard to determine function signature and allocate vtable entries.
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10  
A class template may have virtual member functions. A member function may not be both a member function template and a virtual member function. –  James McNellis May 24 '10 at 14:18
1  
it actually fails with gcc 4.4.3. On my system for sure Ubuntu 10.04 –  blueskin Nov 21 '10 at 5:42
    
This is totally different from what the question asked. Here the entire base class is templated. I've compiled this kind of thing before. This would compile on Visual Studio 2010 too –  bigD Feb 13 at 9:18

No template member functions cannot be virtual.

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4  
My curiosity is: Why? What problems does the compiler faces in doing so? –  WannaBeGeek Mar 1 '10 at 6:50
    
You need a declaration in scope (at least, in order to get the types correct). It is required by the standard (and the language) to have a declaration in scope for identifiers you use. –  dirkgently Mar 1 '10 at 7:07

To answer the second part of the question:

If they can be virtual, what is an example of a scenario in which one would use such a function?

This is not an unreasonable thing to want to do. For instance, Java (where every method is virtual) has no problems with generic methods.

One example in C++ of wanting a virtual function template is a member function that accepts a generic iterator. Or a member function that accepts a generic function object.

The solution to this problem is to use type erasure with boost::any_range and boost::function, which will allow you to accept a generic iterator or functor without the need to make your function a template.

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1  
Java generics are syntactic sugar for casting. They are not the same as templates. –  James T. Huggett Jun 5 at 7:18

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