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I'm trying to update an oob area of NAND within U-Boot using 'nand write.oob'. However, my changes aren't taking effect.

The process I'm following is:

  • Use 'nand read.oob' to read the oob section for my offset
  • Use 'md' to display that data and make sure it's what I expect
  • Use 'mm' to modify the data in memory to be what I want
  • Use 'nand write.oob' to write the modified data back to nand
  • Use 'nand read.oob' to read the data back from nand
  • Use 'md' to display what should be the modified data on nand.

Unfortunately the data that I read back from NAND appears unmodified.

Is there any way to do what I want?

The processor is a TI DM3730 and the NAND part is the MT29C2G48MAKLCJI-6 IT.

Here's the full output of what I'm doing:

Overo # nand info

Device 0: nand0, sector size 128 KiB
  Page size      2048 b
  OOB size         64 b
  Erase size   131072 b
Overo # nandecc hw
1-bit hamming HW ECC selected
Overo # nand read.oob 0x80010000 0x20000 40

NAND read: device 0 offset 0x20000, size 0x40
 64 bytes read: OK
Overo # md.b 0x80010000 40
80010000: 00 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010010: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010020: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010030: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
Overo # mm.b 0x80010000
80010000: 00 ? ff
80010001: 00 ? ff 
80010002: ff ? q
Overo # md.b 0x80010000 40
80010000: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010010: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010020: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010030: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
Overo # nand write.oob 0x80010000 0x20000 40

NAND write: device 0 offset 0x20000, size 0x40
 64 bytes written: OK
Overo # nand read.oob 0x80010000 0x20000 40

NAND read: device 0 offset 0x20000, size 0x40
 64 bytes read: OK
Overo # md.b 0x80010000 40
80010000: 00 00 ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010010: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010020: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................
80010030: ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff ff    ................

Notice that the data at 0x80010000 and 0x80010002 is not 'ff' as it should be.

share|improve this question
1  
Does the write command you are using automatically erase flash blocks before writing to them? If not, you can probably write 1's (such as your 0xff) to 0's, but not back again, until you explicitly erase. Also, is your NAND perhaps locked against writing? From your prompt it looks like perhaps you have a Gumstix Overo, but please edit your specific processor and NAND chip identities into your question text. – Chris Stratton May 8 '14 at 14:35
    
It doesn't look like the write.oob command erases any flash blocks before writing. So I guess I'd have to read the entire eraseblock in to memory (including oob data), then modify the bits I want in memory, erase that block and then write it all back down using write.raw. That's kind of a pain. Am I correct in thinking that's the only way to go? – Tom Hennen May 8 '14 at 15:03
1  
Sure seems like it - unless you can dig up a data sheet for that particular part that says otherwise. If you are designing a custom scheme, consider if you can create one that only ever needs to write 1's to 0's, and thus avoid the erasing. – Chris Stratton May 8 '14 at 15:10
    
Hmm, That's a pain. If you put this as an answer I'd be happy to accept it. – Tom Hennen May 8 '14 at 15:39

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