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I am working with a REST service provider and they want me to use a client certificate provided by them when making HTTP call.

How does a client cert achieve authentication?
If someone has a copy of the client cert, they too can be authenticated right?
Does a client cert offer anything else beside authentication?
How are they different from a username/password authentication?

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How does a client cert achieve authentication?

By being either directly trusted by the peer, or by being signed by someone the peer trusts, or signed by someone that is trusted by someone the peer trusts, etc.

If someone has a copy of the client cert, they too can be authenticated right?

Wrong. They would also need the private key.

Does a client cert offer anything else beside authentication?

No.

How are they different from a username/password authentication?

Much more secure. No password-guessing is possible.

However There is no such thing as a 'client certificate provided by them'. The process of generating a client certificate starts with you. You generate a key pair and a Certificate Signing Request (CSR) and you have it signed by a CA. Or you generate a self-signed certificate. You then provide your certificate to them. If they are proposing to carry out all these steps and provide the resulting key pair and certificate to you, they do not know what they are talking about and should be severely chastised for security breaches. A private key is only private if no-one else has a copy.

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Thanks. How does a server authenticate client after the client gives the public key via the certificate? In other words, what is the private key of the client cert used for? –  Suneel May 8 at 22:11
    
The client provides not only his certificate but a digital signature over the certificate (and some other stuff) signed by his private key. The server verifies that with the public key. That proves that the client owns that certificate, but only if nobody else has, or has had, access to the private key. That's why 'provided by them' is completely and utterly invalid and insecure. They can't generate a certificate without a private key, and if they generate the private key it isn't private. –  EJP May 8 at 22:17

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