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I am creating a tic-tac-toe program and cannot get the game to accurately check if there is a tie. The tie should be declared when all numbers on the board are filled with 'X' or 'O' & there is no winner.

With the code I have now, every time I run the program it declares there is a tie. Am I placing the function wrong? I think something is wrong INSIDE of the tieGame() boolean.

using namespace std;

char board[9] { //array of characters with number placeholders for chars X and O
    '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '6', '7', '8', '9'
};

bool checkWinner(void) {
    bool winner = false;
    if // Check for possible winning solutions for X
    ((board[0] == 'X' && board[1] == 'X' && board[2] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[3] == 'X' && board[4] == 'X' && board[5] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[6] == 'X' && board[7] == 'X' && board[8] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[0] == 'X' && board[4] == 'X' && board[8] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[2] == 'X' && board[4] == 'X' && board[6] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[0] == 'X' && board[3] == 'X' && board[6] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[1] == 'X' && board[4] == 'X' && board[7] == 'X')
    ||
    (board[2] == 'X' && board[5] == 'X' && board[8] == 'X'))
    {
        winner = 1; // Winner is true if conditions are met
        cout << "Player 1 Wins!" << endl;
    }
    else if // Check for possible winning solutions for O
    ((board[0] == 'O' && board[1] == 'O' && board[2] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[3] == 'O' && board[4] == 'O' && board[5] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[6] == 'O' && board[7] == 'O' && board[8] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[0] == 'O' && board[4] == 'O' && board[8] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[2] == 'O' && board[4] == 'O' && board[6] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[0] == 'O' && board[3] == 'O' && board[6] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[1] == 'O' && board[4] == 'O' && board[7] == 'O')
    ||
    (board[2] == 'O' && board[5] == 'O' && board[8] == 'O'))
    {
        winner = 1; // winner is True if conditions are met
        cout << "Player 2 Wins!" << endl;
    }
    return winner; // Is there a winner?

}

bool tieGame() {
    bool tiegame = false;
    if // check for tie
        ((board[0] == 'X' || 'O') && (board[1] == 'X' || 'O') && (board[2] == 'X' || 'O')
         &&
         (board[3] == 'X' || 'O') && (board[4] == 'X' || 'O') && (board[5] == 'X' || 'O')
         &&
         (board[6] == 'X' || 'O') && (board[7] == 'X' || 'O') && (board[8] == 'X' || 'O'))
    {
        tiegame = 1;
        cout << "The game is a tie!  Play again!" << endl;
    }
    else {
        tiegame = 0;
    }
    return tiegame; //  Is the game a tie?
}


void displayBoard(void) { //Displays the game board
    int index; // used to access the array
    index = 0;
    cout << endl;
    cout << board[index] << "|" << board[index+1] << "|" << board[index+2] << endl;
    cout << "-----" << endl;
    cout << board[index+3] << "|" << board[index+4] << "|" << board[index+5] << endl;
    cout << "-----" << endl;
    cout << board[index+6] << "|" << board[index+7] << "|" << board[index+8] << endl;
}

void tictactoe(void) { //Main function; displays board and inputs player moves
    int movePosition; // used to track user input and replace array indexes with the user input

    cout << "Player 1 is X, player 2 is O" << endl;
    for (int i=0; i < 5; i++) {
        if (tieGame() ) {
            cout << "Tie game!" << endl;
            return;
        }
        displayBoard(); // Display game board with updated characters
        if (checkWinner() ) //if winner is TRUE, return "Winner" and exit game.
            {
                cout << "Good Game!" << endl;
                return;
            }
        cout << "Player 1, Enter the space number where you would like to place X" << endl;
        cin >> movePosition; // Retrieve user input & call it 'movePosition'
            while ((board[movePosition - 1] == 'X' || board[movePosition - 1] == 'O')) {       //Check to make sure a user has not
                cout <<  "This space is already taken.  Please choose an open space." << endl; // attempted to enter a
                cin >> movePosition;                                                           // value that has already been entered
            }
        board[movePosition - 1] = 'X';
        displayBoard(); // Display game board with updated characters
            if (checkWinner() ) //if winner is TRUE, return "Winner" and exit game.
            {
                cout << "Good Game!" << endl;
                return;
            }
        cout << "Player 2, Enter the space number where you would like to place O" << endl;
        cin >> movePosition;

            while ((board[movePosition - 1] == 'X' || board[movePosition - 1] == 'O')) {
                cout << "This space is already taken.  Please choose an open space." << endl;
                cin >> movePosition;
            }
        board[movePosition - 1] = 'O';
    }
}



int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
    tictactoe();
}
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closed as off-topic by πάντα ῥεῖ, Kerrek SB, CT Zhu, lpapp, Carl Veazey May 9 at 3:23

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question appears to be off-topic because it lacks sufficient information to diagnose the problem. Describe your problem in more detail or include a minimal example in the question itself." – πάντα ῥεῖ, Kerrek SB, CT Zhu, lpapp, Carl Veazey
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Wall of code. First thought: why check every possible unique line -- never heard of loops? –  Jongware May 8 at 22:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The conditions like the following are wrong:

(board[0] == 'X' || 'O')

Because of C++ operator precedence and evaluation rules, the compiler understands it as:

(board[0] == 'X') || ('O' != 0)

The second part is, of course, always true, so it always succeeds for every field and therefore for the whole board.

You would need to write it explicitly in two comparisons like this:

(board[0] == 'X' || board[0] == 'O')

For the future, a better solution than a bunch of conditions would be a loop, for example:

bool tieGame()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
        if (board[i] != 'X' && board[i] != 'O') {
            // Some field is empty, not a tie
            return false;
        }
    }
    // All fields are either 'X' or 'O'
    cout << "The game is a tie!  Play again!" << endl;
    return true;
}

And even more better, as Nenad wrote in his answer, just count the number of free spaces left (or the used fields) -- that's just one variable comparison instead of going through the whole board each time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much - I decided to go with using the counters for this project. Simple, and effective. I appreciate all the help guys! –  user3516440 May 8 at 23:12

You can check if it's a tie by having a counter

int freeSpaces = 9;

Which you will decrement each time players fills an empty slot on board. Then check

if (freeSpaces == 0 && !winner) tieGame = true;
else tieGame = false;
share|improve this answer

The expressions of the form (board[0] == 'X' || 'O') always evaluate to true since 'O' is a non-zero value (79 to be exact). As a result, all your checks for tieGame are true. What you want is (board[0] == 'X' || board[0] == 'O').

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