Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 3 untracked files in my working directory:

$ git sta
## features/subchecks...upstream/BR_4_1_4 [ahead 4]
?? Applications/ETM/Build/Android/.project
?? Applications/zFacebook/Build/Android/.project
?? Core/Barcode/Build/Android/.project

I do a dry run of git clean like so:

$ git clean -n

But it's not showing any files will be cleaned. Why is it not cleaning the .project files? I'm using msysgit 1.9.2 on Windows.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

it's because you need to add -d to git clean to have it clean directories as well:

% git help clean

OPTIONS
       -d
           Remove untracked directories in addition to untracked files. If an untracked directory is managed by a different Git repository, it is not
           removed by default. Use -f option twice if you really want to remove such a directory.
share|improve this answer
    
I can't specify the d option because then it will say it's cleaning way more files than necessary. Directories that contain nothing but ignored files (but the directory itself isn't ignored) will be marked for deletion and I don't want that. Basically every untracked file and/or directory that appears in git status should be removed, nothing more. –  Robert Dailey May 9 at 22:07
    
then what you want is @RobertDailey's solution –  zmo May 9 at 22:51

To put the tree back into a fully clean slate and get rid of everything I have locally which is not tracked by git I do the following...

git clean -fdx

If you want to leave in place untracked files that are ignored by git (.gitignore) then leave the "x" off.

share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using git clean for this won't work, but the following did work for me and only cleaned what I saw in git status:

$ rm $(git ls-files --others --exclude-standard)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.