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I have this code, but it won't compile and i can't understand what is wrong - i guess the pointering of the vector is not correct. My idea was to collect some numbers in main() and store them in a vector and array, and then pass the memory address of them to a function, and using a pointers to print the data stored.

I came up with this when i read something about pointers which said that i should use them in order to save memory, so IMO the code below will not copy the contents of the vector and the array but use a pointer to access their location in memory - that's what i want to do.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

void function(vector<int>* a, int *s)
{
    cout << "function starts.." << endl;
    for(int i=0;i<a->size();i++)
    {
        cout << a[i] << endl;
        cout << s[a[i]] << endl;
    }
    cout << "function ends..." << endl;
}


int main(void)
{
    vector<int> m;
    int s[102];
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        m.push_back(i*i);
        s[i*i] = i-2;
    }
    function(&m, &s);
    return 0;
}

I receive several errors on compiling, something is wrong.

Please tell me what's wrong with my code and how to fix it. thank you...

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1  
Is it part of your question to guess on the compilation errors you get? ;-) –  Péter Török Mar 1 '10 at 12:09
1  
I have taught C and C++ programming for years, so I am very good at guessing already since the usual problem description is "doesn't work". The Crystal Ball I bought from eBay also helps. –  Tronic Mar 1 '10 at 12:16
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should pass the vector by reference, not by pointer:

void function(vector<int>& a, int *s)

And then

function(m, ...);

Using [] on a pointer to a vector would certainly cause strange problems because it behaves as if a pointed to an array of std::vectors (while it actually only points to one). The vectors itself are never indexed by that. You could also use (*a)[...] to index the vector by the pointer.

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1  
make sure when you make the change above to make the call like this: function(m, s); –  Charles Beattie Mar 1 '10 at 12:17
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if you insist in parsing by pointer then the correct syntax shoulld be:

void function(vector<int>* a, int *s[]) 
{ 
    cout << "function starts.." << endl; 
    for(int i=0;i<a->size();i++) 
    { 
        cout << (*a)[i] << endl; 
        cout << (*s)[(*a)[i]] << endl; 
    } 
    cout << "function ends..." << endl; 
} 
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error: cannot convert 'int ()[102]' to 'int*' It's not working. –  VaioIsBorn Mar 1 '10 at 12:25
    
Sorry read AndreyT comment below. But please call funtion(m,s) and parse by reference instead. –  Charles Beattie Mar 1 '10 at 13:13
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(corrected)

&s is in fact int(*)[102]: pointer to a pointer to an array of 102 items.

You should just say

function(&m, s);

This is because by old C legacy rule, an array is essentially a const pointer to its item with index 0. So s is already int*

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1  
&s is not int **. &s is int (*)[102]. Array is not a const pointer. In value context it might appear so, but not in this case, when address is taken. –  AndreyT Mar 1 '10 at 12:22
    
Yes, indeed. Anyway, &s is not a int*, it would have sufficed to pass s as argument. –  Vlad Mar 1 '10 at 13:36
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This version works:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

void function(const vector<int>& a, int s [102])
{
    cout << "function starts.." << endl;
    for(int i=0;i<(int)a.size();i++)
    {
        cout << a [i] << endl;
        cout << s[a [i]] << endl;
    }
    cout << "function ends..." << endl;
}


int main(void)
{
    vector<int> m;
    int s[102];
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
    {
        m.push_back(i*i);
        s[i*i] = i-2;
    }
    function(m, s);
    return 0;
}
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Nice, it works. But as i can see s is not passed as pointer - why ? I would also like to pass a pointer to s in the function so i don't pass the whole array to the function - is there any way to do that ? –  VaioIsBorn Mar 1 '10 at 12:55
    
Passing the whole array by value is not good practice. I'd use "void function(const vector<int>& a, int *s)" and call it as "function(m, s);" –  codebolt Mar 1 '10 at 13:01
    
@VaiolsBorn: It is passed as a pointer - you can't pass an array by value in C++. int s[102] in the parameters is completely equivalent to int s[] (the size is ignored anyway) and int* s (array decays to pointer anyway). –  visitor Mar 1 '10 at 13:01
    
Here it is: void function(const vector<int>& a, int *s) { cout << "function starts.." << endl; for(int i=0;i<(int)a.size();i++) { cout << a [i] << endl; cout << s[a [i]] << endl; } cout << "function ends..." << endl; } –  ileon Mar 1 '10 at 13:01
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First of all in the main program s is a pointer to an int, while m is a vector. Thus the function call should be as follows:

function(&m, s);

Secondly in the function a is a pointer to a vector, so should be indexed as follows: (*a)[i].

However you should really be using const references to pass your vector around:

void function(const vector& a, int *s) { .. cout << a[i] << endl; .. }

And call it like:

function(m, s);

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