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APUE3 says "All threads within a single process have access to the same process components, such as file descriptors and memory.", and "each thread has its own stack". I have some confusions, though.

What kind of variables are 'shared' by all threads? By 'sharing', I mean that, for example, if one thread change X's value, anohter thread can see this change. I guess only those 'global' variables (i.e., that are defined outside all functions), right?

If a thread (not the main thread/process) exits, are 'global' variables defined in this thread still available in other threads?

How about the static variables defined in a function within a thread, if this thread exits?

If I create a thread T in a function F, and passes the pointer/address of some local variable (say, &V) of F to T's start-up function, if F returns, I guess is &V is no longer invalid. What will happen?

and some other confusions like that....

Thanks for clarifying!

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2 Answers 2

APUE3 says "All threads within a single process have access to the same process components, such as file descriptors and memory.", and "each thread has its own stack". I have some confusions, though.

What kind of variables are 'shared' by all threads? By 'sharing', I mean that, for example, if one thread change X's value, anohter thread can see this change. I guess only those 'global' variables (i.e., that are defined outside all functions), right?

Yes, global variables. Those not defined as local (stack) variables in functions, but rather those in the program's data sections.

If a thread (not the main thread/process) exits, are 'global' variables defined in this thread still available in other threads?

Invalid question. Global variables are just that: global. They're not defined in any one thread - they exist for all threads in a process.

How about the static variables defined in a function within a thread, if this thread exits?

Static has to do with visibility, not lifetime / storage. You can (and should!) have static global variables.

If I create a thread T in a function F, and passes the pointer/address of some local variable (say, &V) of F to T's start-up function, if F returns, I guess is &V is no longer invalid. What will happen?

Anything can happen, including demons flying out of your nose.

Basically think of two processes (running the same executable program) as two completely separate copies that can't interfere with each other in any way.

Now two threads running (in the -same process-) are almost the opposite of that concept. They share almost everything. So a thread is completely free to modify global variables that another thread might be accessing. Preventing these dangerous situations are generally known as synchronization topics.

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The entire memory space is shared. The stack of one thread is accessible to the stack of another thread, for instance. This kind of code is possible:

{
  message_t msg;  /* fictitious type */
  msg_fill(&msg, ...);
  msg_send(message_box, &msg);  /* blocks */
  /* ... */
}

The thread passes the address of a local variable into the send_msg API. Another thread is doing something like this:

{
  message_t *pmsg;

  while ((pmsg = msg_recv(message_box)) != 0) {
     /* process pmsg */
     msg_reply(pmsg, MSG_OK); 
     /* no need to free pmsg: other thread owns it */
  }
}

In other words, the other thread works with the first thread's stack memory, which is referenced by pmsg.

Suppose that msg_send has a bug, which allows the thread to wake up prematurely before the message is processed and the reply is received. Or suppose that the thread which calls msg_recv and processes the message hangs on to the pmsg pointer after calling msg_reply. Either way, the sending thread returns from its scope, and so the msg variable is no longer valid. This situation is simply the use of a pointer to an object which no longer exists: the same as when you make this error in an ordinary single-threaded program (only with new complications and debugging difficulties).

Of course, as always, the scoping features of the programming language prevent direct access from one scope to another. The automatic variables of a block are private to the invocation of that block. Even with a single thread of execution, when recursion takes place (or signals/interrupts which re-enter the same block), these activations get their own variables.

Static variables are singly instantiated and have a lifetime which is that of the program. Block scope static variables continue to exist even when no thread is currently executing the block.

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