Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to perform pca with R.

I have the following data matrix:

         V2  V3  V4 V5   V6
2430   0 168 290 45 1715
552928  188  94 105 60 3374
55267    0   0 465  0 3040
27787   0   0   0  0 3380
938270   0  56  56  0 2039
249165   0   0 332  0 2548
31009   0   0   0  0 2690
314986   0   0   0  0 2897
5001    0   0   0  0 3453
28915   0 262 175  0 2452
5261    0   0 351  0 3114
74412   0 109  54  0 2565
16007   0   0 407  0 1730
6614   0  71 179  0 2403
419    0   0   0  0 2825

with 15 variables and 5 samples.

I tried the following code (which uses the transpose of my data matrix):

fit <- prcomp(t(dt))
summary(fit) # print variance accounted for
loadings(fit) # pc loadings
plot(fit,type="lines") # scree plot
fit$scores # the principal components
biplot(fit)

which returns:

> summary(fit) # print variance accounted for
Importance of components:
                             PC1       PC2       PC3      PC4       PC5
Standard deviation     4651.1348 298.09026 126.79032 41.03270 3.474e-13
Proportion of Variance    0.9951   0.00409   0.00074  0.00008 0.000e+00
Cumulative Proportion     0.9951   0.99918   0.99992  1.00000 1.000e+00


loadings(fit) # pc loadings
NULL
> plot(fit,type="lines") # scree plot
> fit$scores # the principal components
NULL

I then tried with the original data matrix (not transposed):

fit <- prcomp(dt)
summary(fit) # print variance accounted for
loadings(fit) # pc loadings
plot(fit,type="lines") # scree plot
fit$scores # the principal components
biplot(fit)

Importance of components:
                            PC1       PC2      PC3      PC4     PC5
Standard deviation     562.2600 156.13452 75.59006 43.63721 9.21936
Proportion of Variance   0.9079   0.07001  0.01641  0.00547 0.00024
Cumulative Proportion    0.9079   0.97788  0.99429  0.99976 1.00000

> loadings(fit) # pc loadings
NULL
> plot(fit,type="lines") # scree plot
> fit$scores # the principal components
NULL
> biplot(fit)

In both cases, I have 5 principal components that explain 100% of the variability. However, since I have 15 variables, shouldn't 100% of variability be explained by 15 variables?

share|improve this question
2  
Nope, if you have only 5 observations in each column of the transposed matrix, then only 5 columns will be enough to express all others. You can only have as many principal components as you have linearly independent columns. – ilir May 9 '14 at 8:36
    
I'd recommend some previous effort in reading the basics about the method. You'll find a lot of references at cran. A nice book on multivariate methods is Everit and Hothorn. – Paulo Cardoso May 9 '14 at 8:51
    
@PauloCardoso thanks for the reference – teaLeef May 9 '14 at 8:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The number of principal components can never exceed the number of samples. Perhaps too simply put, since you only have 5 samples you only need 5 variables to explain the variability.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.