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I have a C# code that looks like this:

foreach (var entry in this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
                     .Where(e => e.Entity is IAuditableTable &&
                                 e.State == EntityState.Added))
{
    IAuditableTable e = (IAuditableTable)entry.Entity;
    e.ModifiedDate = DateTime.Now;
}

This seems to be like a combination of foreach and LINQ. Can sometone tell me is it possible for me to remove the foreach and combine this into one LINQ statement

share|improve this question
1  
It seems doable. – Tolga Evcimen May 9 '14 at 10:15
1  
I recommend using LINQ for the part without side effect, and foreach for the side effect part, in this case the mutation of e. – CodesInChaos May 9 '14 at 15:02
    
You could. Please do not. Use a query to ask a question. Use a foreach to perform an action. Do not use queries to perform actions. – Eric Lippert May 9 '14 at 20:09
up vote 31 down vote accepted

I'd suggest not doing this. Keep everything as readable as possible:

var auditableTables = this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
                                        .Where(e => e.State == EntityState.Added)
                                        .Select(e => e.Entity)
                                        .OfType<IAuditableTable>();

foreach (var table in auditableTables)
{
    table.ModifiedDate = DateTime.Now;
}

My rule of thumb for coding - if you can't read it like a sentence, then it needs fixing.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't remember off hand but doesn't this assume State is a property defined within IAuditableTable? (Because of usage of OfType) – Sayse May 9 '14 at 10:27
    
Very true :) While the other answers looks like just for answering the question, this one really suggests a neat way to handle situation. Thanks. – Tolga Evcimen May 9 '14 at 10:27
    
@Sayse Whoops! Missed a Select. Will add. Thanks! – dav_i May 9 '14 at 10:33
    
@CodesInChaos OP's code implies the opposite of that as they're checking e.Entity is IAuditableTable – dav_i May 9 '14 at 14:58
    
@dav_i Missed that part. My mistake – CodesInChaos May 9 '14 at 15:01

The best you could do is

foreach (var entry in from x in this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
                      where x.Entity is IAuditableTable &&
                            x.State == EntityState.Added
                      select (IAuditableTable)x.Entity)
{
    entry.ModifiedDate = DateTime.Now;
}

There is no query syntax for updates.

share|improve this answer

Here you go:

this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
    .Where(e => e.Entity is IAuditableTable && e.State == EntityState.Added)
    .ToList()
    .ForEach(entry => {
        IAuditableTable e = (IAuditableTable) entry.Entity;
        e.ModifiedDate = DateTime.Now;
    });
share|improve this answer
5  
Hold on, the question is not about efficiency, but whether it is possible. And answer yes, it is possible, you might not like it, but Microsoft did invented ForEach() and provided capability to use foreach in LINQ style – Borys Generalov May 9 '14 at 11:22
1  
@BorysGeneralov 1. ForEach behaves way, way differently from foreach. ForEach uses for loop in .NET 4 and while in .NET 4.5. In .NET 4.0 this allows you to cause undefined behavior. Fortunately, there's a version check in .NET 4.5 (throws InvalidOperationException). Basically, saying that foreach (var e : enumerable) {} is the same as enumerable.ToList().ForEach(e => {})` is totally wrong. 2. For metro apps this won't compile, because ForEach is gone there. – Leri May 9 '14 at 12:23
2  
3. Efficiency is always the important especially with collections. – Leri May 9 '14 at 12:24
3  
+1 Borys answered the question as asked. – Three Value Logic May 9 '14 at 12:26
3  
@DavidBainbridge While true, SO is also about good code. We don't want some dummy coming along and just copy-pasting this bad code into their application. This answer should say, "Yes, it is possible: <code> However, this has additional overhead because..." – Cole Johnson May 9 '14 at 17:00

This should do it.

this.ChangeTracker.Entries()
    .Where(e => e.Entity is IAuditableTable &&
                e.State == EntityState.Added)
    .ToList().ForEach(entry => {
        IAuditableTable e = (IAuditableTable)entry.Entity;
        e.ModifiedDate = DateTime.Now;
    });
share|improve this answer
4  
-1 While this is working this method is very processor intensive, you actually enumerating the enumerable twice, once with ToList() and once with the ForEach() call. – ISun May 9 '14 at 15:38
    
This also is highly unreadable. – Cole Johnson May 9 '14 at 16:57
1  
@ISun It's important to note the double enumeration here but it answers the question, I don't think it deserves the downvote. – asawyer May 9 '14 at 18:01
    
Thanks for the backup @asawyer, as you said this is the exact answer to OPs question. Does not claim any perfection. And if you look at my comment on accepted answer, you'll see that I accepted that answer is the best one. – Tolga Evcimen May 10 '14 at 4:50
    
You can right a ForEach extension for IEnumarable that behaves the same way as the list ForEach and just use a normal foreach loop in the extension. – Letseatlunch May 13 '14 at 19:53

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