Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working with this:

GNU bash, version 4.1.2(1)-release (x86_64-redhat-linux-gnu)

I have a script like below:

#!/bin/bash

e=2

function test1() {
  e=4
  echo "hello"
}

test1 
echo "$e"

Which returns:

hello
4

But if I assign the result of the function to a variable, the global variable e is not modified:

#!/bin/bash

e=2

function test1() {
  e=4
  echo "hello"
}

ret=$(test1)

echo "$ret"
echo "$e"

Returns:

hello
2

I've heard of the use of eval in this case, so I did this in test1:

eval 'e=4'

But the same result.

Could you explain me why it is not modified? How could I save the echo of the test1 function in ret and modify the global variable too?

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to return hello ? You could just echo $e for it to return. Or echo everything you want and then parse the result ? –  Jidder May 9 at 13:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe you can use a file, write to file inside function, read from file after it. I have changed e to an array. In this example blanks are used as separator when reading back the array.

#!/bin/bash

declare -a e
e[0]="first"
e[1]="secondddd"

function test1 () {
 e[2]="third"
 e[1]="second"
 echo "${e[@]}" > /tmp/tempout
 echo hi
}

ret=$(test1)

echo "$ret"

read -r -a e < /tmp/tempout
echo "${e[@]}"
echo "${e[0]}"
echo "${e[1]}"
echo "${e[2]}"

Output:

hi
first second third
first
second
third
share|improve this answer

When you use a command substitution (ie the $(...) construct), you are creating a subshell. Subshells inherit variables from their parent shells, but this only works one way - a subshell cannot modify the environment of its parent shell. Your variable e is set within a subshell, but not the parent shell. There are two ways to pass values from a subshell to its parent. First, you can output something to stdout, then capture it with a command substitution:

myfunc() {
    echo "Hello"
}

var="$(myfunc)"

echo "$var"

Gives:

Hello

For a numerical value from 0-255, you can use return to pass the number as the exit status:

myotherfunc() {
    echo "Hello"
    return 4
}

var="$(myotherfunc)"
num_var=$?

echo "$var - num is $num_var"

Gives:

Hello - num is 4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the point, but I have to return an string array, and within the function I have to add elements to two global string arrays. –  Joana May 9 at 13:00
    
You realise that if you just run the function without assigning it to a variable all the global variables within it will update. Instead of returning a string array, why not just update the string array in the function then assign it to another variable after the function has finished ? –  Jidder May 9 at 13:46
    
@JohnDoe: You can't return a "string array" from a function. All you can do is print a string. However, you can do something like this: setarray() { declare -ag "$1=(a b c)"; } –  rici May 9 at 15:15

It's because command substitution is performed in a subshell, so while the subshell inherits the variables, changes to them are lost when the subshell ends.

Reference:

Command substitution, commands grouped with parentheses, and asynchronous commands are invoked in a subshell environment that is a duplicate of the shell environment

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks, and you know how to solve it? –  Joana May 9 at 12:53
    
@JohnDoe I'm not sure it's possible. You might have to rethink your design of the script. –  Joachim Pileborg May 9 at 12:55
    
Oh, but I need to assing a global array within a function, if not, I'd have to repeat a lot of code (repeat the code of the function -30 lines- 15 times -one per call-). There is no other way, isn't it? –  Joana May 9 at 12:58

What you are doing, you are executing test1

$(test1)

in a sub-shell( child shell ) and Child shells cannot modify anything in parent.

You can find it in bash manual

Please Check what results in a subshell here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.