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I'm using R for my statistics but I'm having a bit of problems figuring out how to do the following: Suppose my data set to be like the one below. These are benchmark results from a program I wrote. I have multiple runs with the same parameters to balance out my results. The data shown below is indeed just a copy of a single set. This is just to be clear about what I mean. So for example I could have two records like this:

threadcount; cachesize; requestspersecond;
 100; 50; 1234;
 100; 50; 5678;

So, what I want to achieve is a plot that shows for 100 threads, the requestspersecond equals 3456.

To plot my data when I only have 1 run for each parameter I do the following:

plot(entireDataSet$threadcount, entireDataSet$requestspersecond, type="s")

I have looked around to find a solution with some sort of for loop but I can't seem to find any.

I could manually average all the results but that seems contradictory with using R.

Could anyone point me in the right direction?

threadcount; cachesize; requestspersecond; 
0; 50; 0; 
100; 50; 591880; 
200; 50; 550766; 
300; 50; 514453; 
400; 50; 746907; 
500; 50; 282650; 
600; 50; 418783; 
700; 50; 1048451; 
800; 50; 606281; 
900; 50; 563941; 
1000; 50; 481376; 
0; 50; 0; 
100; 50; 591880; 
200; 50; 550766; 
300; 50; 514453; 
400; 50; 746907; 
500; 50; 282650; 
600; 50; 418783; 
700; 50; 1048451; 
800; 50; 606281; 
900; 50; 563941; 
1000; 50; 481376; 
share|improve this question
    
A comment to improve my question accompanying a downvote is always a great idea. Just saying. – Christophe De Troyer May 9 '14 at 13:54
    
I didn't downvote you, but I'm confused about your example data; it looks like the same thing repeated twice? – TARehman May 9 '14 at 13:54
    
Yes, that is indeed the case. I just did that to show what I mean. My actual data is much bigger and unsorted so it seemed clearer to post it like that. I'll elaborate it in my question. – Christophe De Troyer May 9 '14 at 13:55
    
Alright, I think I see what you're asking. – TARehman May 9 '14 at 13:56
    
Not sure why the downvotes, this isn't a bad question. You can use aggregate() as I showed in my answer. – TARehman May 9 '14 at 14:00
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use aggregate to create a unified data frame for each combination that you choose, as follows:

agg_df <- aggregate(x=list(RPS=entireDataSet$requestspersecond),
                    by=list(Threadcount=entireDataSet$threadcount),
                    FUN=mean)

plot(agg_df$Threadcount,
     agg_df$RPS,
     type="s")
share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I meant! :) Thank you for your patience! I didn't know what to make of it or how to Google it. Thank you very much! – Christophe De Troyer May 9 '14 at 14:01

Besides aggregate from base R, there are several other options:

1: the plyr package:

library(plyr)
new.df <- ddply(entireDataSet, .(threadcount), summarise, rps = mean(requestspersecond))

2: the dplyr package:

library(dplyr)
new.df <- entireDataSet %>%
  group_by(threadcount) %>%
  summarise(rps = mean(requestspersecond))

3: the data.table package:

library(data.table)
new.df <- setDT(entireDataSet)[, .(rps = mean(requestspersecond)), by = threadcount]
share|improve this answer

Could you use aggregate to obtain the mean requestspersecond for each threadcount in your dataset?

share|improve this answer
    
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. – Lance Nov 4 '15 at 0:35
    
I think it was a rhetorical question. TARehman's more detailed answer does what I suggested. – Nicholas Nov 4 '15 at 15:26

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