Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a tab limited data that reads

1 0 0 1 1 Black Swan
0 0 1 0 0 Golden Duck
1 0 0 1 0 Brown Eagle
0 0 1 0 1 Golden Duck
1 0 0 1 0 Black Swan
1 0 1 0 0 Golden Duck
1 0 0 1 1 Sparrow

The last column is a combination of one or more words separated by space. I want to count the number of unique values in the last column and replace that with a number which is unique to that group. I know I can count the and list the numbers using

awk -F '\t' '{print $NF}'  infile | sort | uniq | wc -l

But how do I replace with numbers? For example, replace all Black Swan by 1, replace all Golden Duck by 2 etc. I want the result to be :

1 0 0 1 1 1
0 0 1 0 0 2
1 0 0 1 0 3
0 0 1 0 1 2
1 0 0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0 0 2
1 0 0 1 1 4

and I also want to generate the list of numbers given to specific values like

Black Swan 1
Golden Duck 2
Brown Eagle 3
Sparrow 4
share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use an associate array to increment a counter for each different name:

awk '
    BEGIN { 
        FS = OFS = "\t" 
        i = 0
    }
    {
        if (! names[$NF]) {
            names[$NF] = ++i
        }
        $NF = names[$NF]
        print $0
    }
    END {
        for (name in names) {
            printf "%s %d\n", name, names[name]
        }
    }
' infile

It yields:

1       0       0       1       1       1
0       0       1       0       0       2
1       0       0       1       0       3
0       0       1       0       1       2
1       0       0       1       0       1
1       0       1       0       0       2
1       0       0       1       1       4
Golden Duck 2
Brown Eagle 3
Sparrow 4
Black Swan 1
share|improve this answer
    
+1 nicely done! – jaypal singh May 9 '14 at 14:11
    
Agreed. No need to init i obviously, and the printf at the end could just be a print but nbd. – Ed Morton May 9 '14 at 15:30

I started writing this so I'll finish:

awk '
BEGIN {FS = OFS = "\t"}
{
    last[$NF] = (last[$NF] ? last[$NF] : ++cnt)
    $NF = last[$NF]
    line[NR] = $0
}
END {
    for (nr=1; nr<=NR; nr++) 
        print line[nr]
    for (name in last) 
        print name, last[name]
}' file
1       0       0       1       1       1
0       0       1       0       0       2
1       0       0       1       0       3
0       0       1       0       1       2
1       0       0       1       0       1
1       0       1       0       0       2
1       0       0       1       1       4
Brown Eagle     3
Black Swan      1
Sparrow         4
Golden Duck     2

Update:

Here is a perl alternate:

perl -F'\t' -lane '
    $h{$F[-1]} = ++$c unless exists $h{$F[-1]}; 
    $F[-1] = $h{$F[-1]}; 
    print join "\t", @F }{ print "$_  $h{$_}" for keys %h
' file
1       0       0       1       1       1
0       0       1       0       0       2
1       0       0       1       0       3
0       0       1       0       1       2
1       0       0       1       0       1
1       0       1       0       0       2
1       0       0       1       1       4
Golden Duck  2
Brown Eagle  3
Black Swan  1
Sparrow  4

Here is another update based on mpapec's excellent comment:

perl -F'\t' -lane '
    $F[-1] = $h{$F[-1]} ||= ++$c; 
    print join "\t", @F }{ print "$_  $h{$_}" for keys %h
' file 
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, just $h{$F[-1]} = $h{$F[-1]} ? $h{$F[-1]} : ++$c; can be written as $h{$F[-1]} = $h{$F[-1]} || ++$c; or $h{$F[-1]} ||= ++$c; for short, and splice @F, -1, 1, $h{$F[-1]}; as $F[-1] = $h{$F[-1]}. For golfing only purposes that can be further shortened $F[-1] = $h{$F[-1]} ||= ++$c; – Сухой27 May 9 '14 at 16:36
    
Thanks @mpapec, that looks really great. Will update the answer. – jaypal singh May 9 '14 at 16:38

What you want to do is create a set of the unique data. A set is a dictionary, or hash table, with all unique elements. After you create your set, you can search through it and replace the string with the appropriate value.

Here is another link for sets to help you out:

http://world.std.com/~swmcd/steven/perl/pm/set.html

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.