Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to implement a SwingWorker class within my application. Is there a way to set a length of time that after which, the SwingWorker "times out"? I was thinking that maybe throwing an OutOfTime exception that I can catch and then deal with. I'm just not sure how to implement it.

Thanks for all your help!

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why not embed your task within a Runnable, drop it into a new single-threaded ExecutorService and then perform a get() on the resulting Future with an appropriate timeout. That would give you your timeout functionality, since get() will throw an exception if the job doesn't complete in time.

share|improve this answer
    
Also: just calling get() with a timeout would still leave the (presumably expensive) work getting done later. The task also needs to be canceled (and written in such a way that canceling it actually works) –  Sbodd Mar 1 '10 at 15:21
    
You can interrupt() your work via a Future.cancel() method –  Brian Agnew Mar 1 '10 at 16:44
    
(which generates a ThreadInterruptedException, I think) –  Brian Agnew Mar 1 '10 at 16:44
    
Yes - mostly just added that to make sure the asker knew. (And Future.cancel() just sets the thread.interrupted() flag - you then have to actually write your code to check for it. Some but not all of the Java-defined blocking methods are interruptible.) –  Sbodd Mar 1 '10 at 21:14

The short answer is "it's hard", depending on what your requirements are. I highly recommend reading Java Concurrency In Practice.

The basic thing you could do would be to (a) make sure your SwingWorker's Runnable is interrupt-friendly, and (b) set a Timer (or use the blocking get() call Brian mentioned) to cancel your Future.

share|improve this answer

The inner class MySwingWorker may well do what you need:

package com.misc;

import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.util.concurrent.Callable;
import java.util.concurrent.FutureTask;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class FutureStuffGUI extends JFrame {
/**
 * Provides a variant of SwingWorker which operates with a timeout.
 * 
 * @param <T>
 */
private static abstract class MySwingWorker<T> {

    private T result;
    private Exception raised;

    /**
     * Constructor.
     * 
     * @param timeout
     * @param timeUnit
     */
    public MySwingWorker(final long timeout, final TimeUnit timeUnit) {
        result = null;
        raised = null;

        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " starting");
        final FutureTask<T> future = new FutureTask<T>(new Callable<T>() {
            public T call() throws Exception {
                System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " running");
                T result = doInBackground();
                return result;
            }
        });
        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " future: " + future);
        final Thread runner = new Thread(null, future, "FutureThread");
        Thread watcher = new Thread(null, new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                runner.start();
                try {
                    result = future.get(timeout, timeUnit);
                } catch (Exception ex) {
                    raised = ex;
                }
                SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        assert SwingUtilities.isEventDispatchThread();
                        done();
                    }
                });
            }
        }, "WatcherThread");
        watcher.start();
    }

    /**
     * Implement this method as the long-running background task.
     * 
     * @return
     * @throws Exception
     */
    abstract protected T doInBackground() throws Exception;

    /**
     * This method is invoked from the UI Event Dispatch Thread on completion or timeout.
     */
    abstract protected void done();

    /**
     * This method should be invoked by the implementation of done() to retrieve
     * the result.
     * 
     * @return
     * @throws Exception
     */
    protected T get() throws Exception {
        assert SwingUtilities.isEventDispatchThread();
        if (raised != null) {
            throw raised;
        } else {
            return result;
        }
    }
}

public FutureStuffGUI() {
    super("Hello");
    init_components();
}

private void init_components() {
    JPanel panel = new JPanel();
    JButton button = new JButton("Press");
    panel.add(button);
    add(panel);
    pack();

    button.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            new MySwingWorker<String>(5, TimeUnit.SECONDS) {

                @Override
                protected String doInBackground() throws InterruptedException {
                    assert !SwingUtilities.isEventDispatchThread();
                    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " doInBackground");
//                        if (true) { throw new RuntimeException("Blow up"); }
                    Thread.sleep(6 * 1000);
                    return "Hello world!";
                }

                @Override
                protected void done() {
                    assert SwingUtilities.isEventDispatchThread();
                    String result;
                    try {
                        result = get();
                        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " done; result: " + result);
                    } catch (Exception ex) {
                        System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " done; errored:");
                        ex.printStackTrace();
                    }
                }
            };
        };
    });
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    FutureStuffGUI ui = new FutureStuffGUI();
    ui.setVisible(true);
}

}

share|improve this answer
    
Implementation of done() will always catch the java.util.concurrent.TimeoutException there. Is that intentional? –  DejanLekic Nov 5 '12 at 11:26

Any particular reason for not using the SwingWorker.get(long, java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit) ? It will throw TimeoutException that you can easily handle in your application.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.