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I have the following scenario:

Class A
{
    public static  A instance;

    static A()
    {
        if(condition)
        {
            instance = new B();
        }
        else
        {
            instance = new A();
        }

    }

    public A()
    {
        WriteSomething();
    }

    virtual void WriteSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A constructor called");
    }

}


Class B : A
{
    public B()
    {
        WriteSomething();
    }

    override void WriteSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B constructor called");
    }

}

The problem is that when A.instance is called the first time and if condition is true and the B() constructor is called, for some reasons I do not undestand the output of the program is "A constructor called".

Can you please help with an explanation!

Thank you!

share|improve this question
2  
Calling virtual function in the constructor may be the problem. Why not try writing output in a separate virtual function? –  Shane Lu May 9 '14 at 15:31
2  
What is setting the condition value? Could you also put the calling code into the question so that we can see everything you're doing? –  Matt Jones May 9 '14 at 15:32
    
This is a stripped down version of a very big legacy code, and it's just for exemplification. The reale code does a lot of things in the virtual method, and cannot be moved somewhere else. –  George Spiridon May 9 '14 at 15:33
    
@MattJones The condition is read from a enviroment variable. The calling code just calls A.instance. –  George Spiridon May 9 '14 at 15:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The constructor for A will always run first, even if you are creating a new B, since B extends A.

You have also inadvertently discovered why it's recommended that you don't put virtual function calls in a constructor (at least in .NET).

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182331.aspx

"When a virtual method is called, the actual type that executes the method is not selected until run time. When a constructor calls a virtual method, it is possible that the constructor for the instance that invokes the method has not executed."

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I forggot about this default OOP behaviour. –  George Spiridon May 9 '14 at 15:47

A.WriteSomething() will always give you "A constructor called" B.WriteSomething() will always give you will always give you "A constructor called". However in a constructor scenario, override is not being called, you can use new keyword to make new voids with the same name. This works the way you want besides a virtual override call. However, the code above is not a good implementation.

Class A
{
    public static  A instance;

    static A()
    {
        if(condition)
        {
            instance = new B();
        }
        else
        {
            instance = new A();
        }

    }

    public A()
    {
        WriteSomething();
    }

    public static void WriteSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A constructor called");
    }

}


Class B : A
{
    public B()
    {
        WriteSomething();
    }

    public static new void WriteSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("B constructor called");
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
You've completely changed the public interface of his classes here. And the new keyword, in the sense used here, is a really bad idea that busts polymorphism. –  Bruce Pierson May 9 '14 at 16:04
    
@BrucePierson I agree, the code itself should be re-written. He was calling a virtual method in the constructor which doesn't make sense. I just wanted to give an example what can be done. –  Tough Coder May 9 '14 at 16:06
1  
Fair enough, but please don't encourage the use of new - it's one of MS's worst ideas. –  Bruce Pierson May 9 '14 at 16:08
    
@BrucePierson :D –  Tough Coder May 9 '14 at 16:46

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