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I am looking for a bit of advice on ways I can make this function quicker.

The function is designed to run through a delimited text file (with CRLF row ends) and remove any carriage returns or line breaks in between data rows.

E.g. A file of -

A|B|C|D
A|B|C|D
A|B|
C|D
A|B|C|D

Would become -

A|B|C|D
A|B|C|D
A|B|C|D
A|B|C|D

The function seems to work well, however when we start processing large files, the performance is too slow. An example is - for 800k rows it takes 3 seconds, for 130 million rows it takes over an hour....

The code is -

private void CleanDelimitedFile(string readFilePath, string writeFilePath, string delimiter, string problemFilePath, string rejectsFilePath, int estimateNumberOfRows)
    {
        ArrayList rejects = new ArrayList();
        ArrayList problems = new ArrayList();

        int safeSameLengthBreak = 0;
        int numberOfLinesSameLength = 0;
        int lineCount = 0;
        int maxCount = 0;
        string previousLine = string.Empty;
        string currentLine = string.Empty;

        // determine after how many rows with the same number of delimiter chars that we can safety 
        // say that we have found the expected length of a row (to save reading the full file twice)
        if (estimateNumberOfRows > 100000000)
            safeSameLengthBreak = estimateNumberOfRows / 200; // set the safe check limit as 0.5% of the file (minimum of 500,000)
        else if (estimateNumberOfRows > 10000000)
            safeSameLengthBreak = estimateNumberOfRows / 50; // set the safe check limit as 2% of the file (minimum of 200,000)
        else
            safeSameLengthBreak = 50000; // set the safe check limit as 50,000 (if there are less than 50,000 this wont be required anyway)

        // open a reader
        using (var reader = new StreamReader(readFilePath))
        {
            // check the file is still being read
            while (!reader.EndOfStream)
            {
                // append the line count (for debugging)
                lineCount += 1;

                // get the current line
                currentLine = reader.ReadLine();

                // get the number of chars in the new line
                int chars = (currentLine.Length - currentLine.Replace(delimiter, "").Length);

                // if the number is higher than the previous maximum set the new maximum
                if (maxCount < chars)
                {
                    maxCount = chars;

                    // the maximum has changed, reset the number of lines in a row with the same delimiter
                    numberOfLinesSameLength = 0;
                }
                else
                {
                    // the maximum has not changed, add to the number of lines in a row with the same delimiter
                    numberOfLinesSameLength += 1;
                }

                // is the number of lines parsed in a row with the same number of delimiter chars above the safe limit? If so break the loop
                if (numberOfLinesSameLength > safeSameLengthBreak)
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        // reset the line count
        lineCount = 0;

        // open a writer for the duration of the next read
        using (var writer = new StreamWriter(writeFilePath))
        {
            using (var reader = new StreamReader(readFilePath))
            {
                // check the file is still being read
                while (!reader.EndOfStream)
                {
                    // append the line count (for debugging)
                    lineCount += 1;

                    // get the current line
                    currentLine = reader.ReadLine();

                    // get the number of chars in the new line
                    int chars = (currentLine.Length - currentLine.Replace(delimiter, "").Length);

                    // check the number of chars in the line matches the required number
                    if (chars == maxCount)
                    {
                        // write line
                        writer.WriteLine(currentLine);

                        // clear the previous line variable as this was a valid write
                        previousLine = string.Empty;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        // add the line to problems
                        problems.Add(currentLine);

                        // append the new line to the previous line
                        previousLine += currentLine;

                        // get the number of chars in the new appended previous line
                        int newPreviousChars = (previousLine.Length - previousLine.Replace(delimiter, "").Length);

                        // check the number of chars in the previous appended line matches the required number
                        if (newPreviousChars == maxCount)
                        {
                            // write line
                            writer.WriteLine(previousLine);

                            // clear the previous line as this was a valid write
                            previousLine = string.Empty;
                        }
                        else if (newPreviousChars > maxCount)
                        {
                            // the number of delimiter chars in the new line is higher than the file maximum, add to rejects
                            rejects.Add(previousLine);

                            // clear the previous line and move on
                            previousLine = string.Empty;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        // rename the original file as _original
        System.IO.File.Move(readFilePath, readFilePath.Replace(".txt", "") + "_Original.txt");

        // rename the new file as the original file name
        System.IO.File.Move(writeFilePath, readFilePath);

        // Write rejects
        using (var rejectWriter = new StreamWriter(rejectsFilePath))
        {
            // loop through the problem array list and write the problem row to the problem file
            foreach (string reject in rejects)
            {
                rejectWriter.WriteLine(reject);
            }
        }

        // Write problems
        using (var problemWriter = new StreamWriter(problemFilePath))
        {
            // loop through the reject array list and write the reject row to the problem file
            foreach (string problem in problems)
            {
                problemWriter.WriteLine(problem);
            }
        }
    }

Any pointers would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
3  
Throw ArrayList to the garbage can. You have a list of strings so a List<string>. I assume that you get a memory problem with so many rows. – Tim Schmelter May 9 '14 at 15:45
    
Are you reading & writing to local files, or files across the network? – David May 9 '14 at 15:47
    
I need to switch from ArrayList to a generic list but there are hardly any rows going into those anyway (less than 10), so I don't think that is the problem. It is currently running across the network (I don't have enough space locally to copy this file). – user1948635 May 9 '14 at 15:51
    
Does your memory usage remain low throughout long runs? – Jeremy Cook May 9 '14 at 15:54
3  
It is currently running across the network sending those lines one by one over the network sounds like a likely candidate for a bottleneck.. Have you done measurements of the difference of a (smaller) local and the network version? – TaW May 9 '14 at 15:59

A few ideas

List<String> 

For rejects and problems and allocate an initial capacity to you think they will need

Don't process over the network
Get an SSD, copy to it, process, write lines to it, and then copy the file back

This does not look like an efficient way to me to count delimeters

int chars = (currentLine.Length - currentLine.Replace(delimiter, "").Length);

This is wastefully expensive: currentLine.Replace(delimiter, "")

int chars = 0;
foreach(char c in currentLine) if (c == delimeter) chars++;

This is not efficient

previousLine += currentLine;

Use StringBuilder
And allocate StringBuilder once outside the loop
In the loop call .Clear()

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestions. Perhaps the network is at fault... It would be interesting to hear if performance changes when running the process on the same computer as the files. Supposing I did my math right, it seems like the process should finish in about 8 minutes if performance held at 3s per 800K lines for all 130 million lines. – Jeremy Cook May 9 '14 at 16:44
    
Thanks. The problems and rejects will not be the issue, as I stated above there are very few, I will eventually add a check to say if there are more than 10 to throw an exception. The length check is apparently very fast (I have not tested comparatively, but I found that snippet as an answer on here). I'll change to a string builder and try running locally. – user1948635 May 9 '14 at 16:48
    
If you can replace code with faster code then why not just do it? – Frisbee May 9 '14 at 16:52
    
@user1948635: That length check is not terribly efficient. You end up allocating a new string every time, and copying all the data. With the foreach, you don't have to copy or allocate anything. – Jim Mischel May 9 '14 at 17:00
1  
@Blam: No need to call ToCharArray in your foreach. You can write foreach (char c in currentLine). Also, although you're right that appending strings is inefficient in the general case, in this case using a StringBuilder will probably be slower. I say that because most likely he'll only be appending one more line. The cost of one append is less than the cost of creating a StringBuilder, calling Append, and then calling ToString. – Jim Mischel May 9 '14 at 17:03

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