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I have a file looks like:

a 1,2,3,5
b 4,5,6,7
c 5,6,7,8
...

That the separator between 1st and 2nd is '\t', other separators are comma. How can I read this kind of data set as as dataframe having 5 fields.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I'd probably do this.

read.table(textConnection(gsub(",", "\t", readLines("file.txt"))))
  V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
1  a  1  2  3  5
2  b  4  5  6  7
3  c  5  6  7  8

Unpacking that just a bit:

  • readLines() reads the file into R as a character vector with one element for each line.
  • gsub(",", "\t", ...) replaces every comma with a tab, so that now we've got lines with just one kind of separating character.
  • textConnection() wraps up the character vector of (modified) file lines so that they appear as a file to read.table(), so that ...
  • read.table can access them like it would an ordinary file.

.

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1  
Great answer, but I don't think textConnection is required here since read.table has a text argument that could be used instead. –  Ananda Mahto May 9 '14 at 16:27
    
@AnandaMahto - Very cool! I had always assumed that text= expected a single character string, but I just tested your suggestion and can confirm that it will indeed take a character vector of multiple elements. –  Josh O'Brien May 9 '14 at 16:29

"Balanced" data

Judging by the way you've phrased your question, it seems that you know that your data are "balanced" (rectangular).

Are you looking for speedier options? You might want to combine fread from "data.table" with my experimental concat.split.DT function.

The solution would look something like (replace " " with "\t" for a tab):

concat.split.DT(fread("yourfile.txt", sep = " ", header=FALSE), "V2", ",")

Let's make up some data:

x <- c("a\t1,2,3,5", "b\t4,5,6,7","c\t5,6,7,8")
X <- c(replicate(10000, x))
temp <- tempfile()
writeLines(X, temp, sep="\n") ## Write it to a temporary file

Josh's answer:

system.time(out1 <- read.table(text = gsub(",", "\t", readLines(temp))))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.679   0.000   0.676 
head(out1)
#   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5
# 1  a  1  2  3  5
# 2  b  4  5  6  7
# 3  c  5  6  7  8
# 4  a  1  2  3  5
# 5  b  4  5  6  7
# 6  c  5  6  7  8
dim(out1)
# [1] 30000     5

fread + concat.split.DT (which is like using fread twice, but is still super fast):

system.time(out2 <- concat.split.DT(fread(temp, sep = "\t", header=FALSE), "V2", ","))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.027   0.000   0.028 
head(out2)
#    V1 V2_1 V2_2 V2_3 V2_4
# 1:  a    1    2    3    5
# 2:  b    4    5    6    7
# 3:  c    5    6    7    8
# 4:  a    1    2    3    5
# 5:  b    4    5    6    7
# 6:  c    5    6    7    8
dim(out2)
# [1] 30000     5

"Unbalanced" data

Although it doesn't apply to your problem, I should mention this for the benefit of others who might need to solve a similar problem:

One limitation of the above is that concat.split.DT only handles "balanced" data. fread doesn't have a fill argument like read.table does (and I seem to remember reading somewhere that it most likely won't have such an argument).

Here's an example of what I mean by unbalanced:

x2 <- c("a\t1,2,3,5,6,7", "b\t4,5,6,7","c\t5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13")
X2 <- c(replicate(10000, x2))
temp2 <- tempfile()
writeLines(X2, temp2, sep="\n")

read.table can handle that with the fill = TRUE argument:

system.time(out1b <- read.table(text = gsub(",", "\t", readLines(temp2)), fill=TRUE))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   1.151   0.000   1.152 
head(out1b)
#   V1 V2 V3 V4 V5 V6 V7 V8 V9 V10
# 1  a  1  2  3  5  6  7 NA NA  NA
# 2  b  4  5  6  7 NA NA NA NA  NA
# 3  c  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12  13
# 4  a  1  2  3  5  6  7 NA NA  NA
# 5  b  4  5  6  7 NA NA NA NA  NA
# 6  c  5  6  7  8  9 10 11 12  13

concat.split.DT will give you a nasty error in such cases, but you can try my cSplit function instead. It's not nearly as fast, but still performs decently:

system.time(out2b <- cSplit(fread(temp2, sep = "\t", header=FALSE), "V2", ","))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.393   0.004   0.399 
head(out2b)
#    V1 V2_1 V2_2 V2_3 V2_4 V2_5 V2_6 V2_7 V2_8 V2_9
# 1:  a    1    2    3    5    6    7   NA   NA   NA
# 2:  b    4    5    6    7   NA   NA   NA   NA   NA
# 3:  c    5    6    7    8    9   10   11   12   13
# 4:  a    1    2    3    5    6    7   NA   NA   NA
# 5:  b    4    5    6    7   NA   NA   NA   NA   NA
# 6:  c    5    6    7    8    9   10   11   12   13
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The option for unbalanced datasets scales much better than the read.table option, so the comparison on 30K rows doesn't really show it off very well. Change the replications to 100K and do a comparison with that. Also, cSplit has a fun feature that lets you create "long" datasets on the fly :-) –  Ananda Mahto May 9 '14 at 16:48
    
On my system, a 300K row "file" took 160.323 seconds with read.table and 2.769 seconds with my cSplit + fread approach. –  Ananda Mahto May 9 '14 at 16:52
Scanner scan = new Scanner(file);
while (scan.hasNextLine()) {
    String[] a = scan.nextLine().replace("\\t", ",").split(",");
    //do something with the array
}
scan.close();

This did:

  1. create a scanner to process the file (Scanner scan)
  2. scan in the next file line (scan.nextLine()) for each file line based on hasNextLine()
  3. replaced tabs with commas (.replace("\t", ",")), so the separators were all the same
  4. split into an array by commas. Now you can process all the data alike regardless of the length of each line.
  5. Don't forget to close the scanner when you're done.
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